About these ads

Tag Archive: Dynamite Comics


SMDMS6 2 cover Ross

Season Two of The Six Million Dollar Man is in full gear.  Issue #2 of Dynamite Comics’ newest monthly series is in comic book stores tomorrow.  Oscar Goldman must tell Steve Austin that O.S.I.’s bionics division is closing its doors.  What will this mean for Steve and Jamie?

An alien organism has made it to Earth’s surface.

Who is the new face-changing Steve Austin doppelganger?  The menace Maskatron is back from the toy shelves of the 1970s to the ongoing story of Colonel Steve Austin.

Issue #2 includes a classic cover design by Alex Ross, with ongoing story by Jim Kuhoric and interior art by Juan Antonio Ramirez.

After the break, check out a preview for The Six Million Dollar Man Season Six, Issue #2, courtesy of Dynamite Comics:

Continue reading

About these ads

Flash01-Cov-Laming

If you’re missing the Flash Gordon of the 1980 movie then a new monthly comic book series beginning today may be for you.  Following the original story elements from Alex Raymond’s original stories first laid down in 1930s comic book strips discussed previously at borg.com here and here, but updating elements to the present day, Dynamite Comics is rebooting Flash Gordon for a new audience.

Issue #1 of the new series finds Flash Gordon and sci-journalist Dale Arden a year ago, with Arden covering the last space shuttle’s decommissioning, and Flash bungee jumping.  One year later at they are about to encounter the planet Mongo, and the dreaded Emperor Ming, for the first time.  That is, after a slight detour to the planet Arboria, and an encounter with Prince Barin.

Like the 1980 movie, this Flash Gordon series has a confident, cocky and a bit foolhardy Flash, and a no-nonsense, sharp, and attractive Dale.  It’s just brought forward a bit with the starting point–34 years updated from the film.  Jeff Parker is the series writer, with art by Evan Shaner.

After the break, we have a preview of Flash Gordon, Issue #1, courtesy of Dynamite Comics:

Continue reading

Legenderry03CovIncenConceptSMDM

We at borg.com have been pretty excited about Bill Willingham and Sergio Fernandez Davila’s new monthly Legenderry: A Steampunk Adventure.  So much so that our resident author and frequent TV and movie reviewer Elizabeth C. Bunce cosplayed one of the characters at Planet Comicon last week (and Willingham said yesterday on Twitter it may be the first time anyone cosplayed one of his non-Fables characters!).  Check out our earlier review of Issues #1 and #2 of the series here.  Call it steampunk, steam-noir, or as Willingham prefers “steampulp,” the new series is moving full steam ahead with the Dynamite Comics arsenal of licensed characters from the past and telling their story in a fun, new way.  And what’s more exciting than taking the Bionic Man in a new direction?

Last month we sneaked a peek at future marketing blurbs and knew this was coming, but the origin story of Major Steve Austin and scientist pal Oscar Goldman was even more intriguing than we could have hoped for.  The opening image of Steve Austin in a wheel chair–the result of some experimental flying gone wrong and an “uncooperative autogyro”–is just plain inspired.

Legenderry03CovBenitez

Austin’s first mission with his $6,000 worth of prosthetics comes about when Captain Victory’s dirigible encounters a disaster in-flight.  Austin and Goldman’s chummy banter is immediately believable and true to their mirror universe 1970s incarnation.

The Six Thousand Dollar Man’s design, both in this month’s Legenderry Issue #3, and the formal look on the cover, has set up a gentlemanly steampunk hero whose exploits, whatever they come to be, could take on the best of the genre–if given a chance.

After the break, check out this preview of Legenderry, Issue #3, from Dynamite Comics, featuring the first appearance of The Six Thousand Dollar Man:

Continue reading

Dynamite sale banner

Dynamite Entertainment is celebrating its 10th anniversary in July, and to begin its year of celebration it is offering a huge sale at ComiXology.com.  Dynamite is offering all of its titles at 50% off (that’s over 1,500 titles).

Go to the link below to find all of Dynamite’s comics at an incredible discount!  To get this discount, the code word is DYNAMITE.

http://www.comixology.com/Dynamite-Sale/page/774

So if you haven’t checked them out already, look for Miss Fury, The Bionic Man, Masks, Grimm, The Twilight Zone, Battlestar Galactica, The Black Bat, and tons of other titles.

The sale lasts until February 13, 2014, so act fast!  This offer can only be redeemed at ComiXology.com and no titles are included that are first released after February 11, 2014.

C.J. Bunce
Editor
borg.com

Masks trade cover

Review by C.J. Bunce

If you’re a connoisseur of classic superheroes, you’d be remiss not to grab the trade edition of Dynamite Comics’ Masks series for your bookshelf.  Inspired by a 1938 story by Norvell Page called The Spider vs. The Empire State, it’s an examination of pre-World War II Law vs. Justice, as nine classic pulp superheroes unite to fight a fascist political party blossoming in New York, bent on taking over the country.

Writer Chris Roberson looks at justice through the eyes of each of these classic superheroes, each having a different take on the evolving political climate, and how to deal with the story’s bad guys.  Where the original source material was a story featuring The Spider, here the heroes take a backseat to The Shadow, whose perfectly shadowy dialogue manages to allow him to steal the scene in each of the story’s eight chapters.  The book starts with a bang–a chapter we previewed here at borg.com in its original printing as Masks, Issue #1, back in November 2012.  Alex Ross provided the interior art for the first chapter, and as much as we’d hope for a full book featuring Ross’s art, artists Dennis Calero provides an excellent look at the 1930s with a very pulp novel feel.

Layout 1

Continue reading

Dark Horse Digital Fantasy Sale

Get it while it lasts…

Dark Horse Digital’s online comic book service is now offering steep discounts on select fantasy titles.  Select from Amala’s Blade #0-4, Conan the Barbarian #1-10 (by Star Wars writer Brian Wood), Dragon Age: Those Who Speak #1-3, Dragon Age: Until We Sleep, #1-3, several Finder books, The Last Dragon, and even Issues #1-8 of one of borg.com‘s favorite series, Dynamite Comics’ Grimm series.

Most of the single issues are offered at 99 cents.

Conan Queen of the Black Coast Grimm1

Purchase and download your books here.  While you’re at it, download free copies of Dungeon Siege III and Falling Skies issues here.

The solicitation for the offer doesn’t include a timeframe, so get them now before Dark Horse Digital no longer has the offer available.

C.J. Bunce
Editor
borg.com

TZ01CovExcluMidtown TZ01CovFrancavilla

Review by C.J. Bunce

If you spent any part of the 72 hours this week getting caught up on the best of The Twilight Zone, courtesy of the Syfy Channel’s annual marathon pilgrimage to the land of Rod Serling, you may find that returning to the real world takes a bit of an effort.  A new comic book series by the critically acclaimed J. Michael Straczynski may help you in your transition.  Dynamite Comics’ Issue #1 of The Twilight Zone is in comic book stores this week, and you’re likely to find it in stock because of low turnouts in stores due to the mid-week holiday.

What does it take to make for a classic tale from The Twilight Zone?  Straczynski’s first issue has the story off to the right start.  He includes a well-concocted Serling-esque introduction.  It’s hard to imagine some of the subjects from the original series being current since they are so far removed from today, but in their initial run each episode dealt with some current political, social, or scientific question.  Issue #1 has the required currency–although anti-Wall Street stories are abundant these days, it’s still a worthy subject and the additional twists make for an intriguing set-up.  Trevor Richmond has taken his company and increased profits well above expectations.  So much so that the feds are sniffing around and Richmond’s methods are soon to be uncovered.

Continue reading

Miss Fury Dynamite Comics

We tried on for size almost every new book that was released from comic book publishers like Dynamite Comics, Dark Horse Comics, IDW Publishing, Archaia/BOOM!, and Image.  We tried to sample the best of all that Marvel and DC Comics had to offer, too, and although we didn’t have enough time to review everything we did try to put out there for your consideration those titles we thought our readers might like to check out, especially those with a sci-fi, fantasy, or retro bent.  Our pull list included issues from Afterlife with Archie to Django Unchained, from Liberator to Larfleezeand from Velvet to The X-Files.  This past month we have reviewed the year-long run of the best of these titles, as we narrowed our selections to 21 of the very best entries in genre entertainment outside of TV and movies, which we revealed here yesterday.  So here are the rest of our picks for the Best of 2013.

Kane Starkiller borg by Mike Mayhew

Best Borg Appearance – Kane Starkiller, The Star Wars.  Borgs showed up everywhere this year, from the lead characters on Almost Human, to Doctor Who, to countless comic book series including Justice League and RoboCop.  Our favorite appearance came from the young mind of George Lucas as he created the original script that would later be edited into the original Star Wars trilogy.  And through Dark Horse Comics’ The Star Wars monthly comic book event we learned one of his best ideas was merged into other roles and one of his best characters entirely cut.   That character was Jedi Kane Starkiller, who would reveal his cyborg chest implants that kept him alive, later to heroically give up this life-saving technology to save his friends.

MissFury001-Cov-Renaud

Best Comic Book Series – Miss Fury, Dynamite Comics.  A uniquely crafted tale, a compelling and seductive superhero, great action panel after panel, sourced in a long-shelved classic character of the Golden Age of comics.  Rob Williams and Jack Herbert’s Miss Fury is a carefully rendered update that rings true to the edgy spirit of the world’s first female superhero.  Beautiful panels set up an ever-changing time and place and pull readers along for the ride.  And stuck-out-of-time Marla Drake and her alter ego Miss Fury could not have looked better, whether carving out her place in the 1940s or as she was teleported into the future.  It’s a series no one should miss.

Clint Barton Hawkeye by Fraction

Best Comic Book Writing – Matt Fraction, Hawkeye.  Last year revealed one of the best comic book series we ever read, focusing on that “other” superhero archer, the second tier Marvel Comics superhero Hawkeye.  Matt Fraction gave us the most interesting set-up and look into the daily life of a superhero who isn’t Captain America or Iron Man.  This year he kept up the momentum in his Hawkeye monthly series, providing stories that challenged readers, each issue taking a different peek into Clint Barton, another costumed superhero called Hawkeye, and their trusty dog.

Continue reading

MissFury007CovSyaf

Sassy, smart, and seductive.  It applies to Marla Drake, the Miss Fury of the 1940s and of today in Dynamite Comics’ time-hopping series Miss Fury.  And it applies to Drake’s masked persona and the series itself.  Writer Rob Williams and artist Jack Herbert have provided their response to the much-lauded Batwoman team of J.H. Williams III and W. Haden Blackman.  And just as the Williams III and Blackman team-up created one of the best comic book series in its first year out of the gates, so has team Williams and Herbert with their first year of Miss Fury.

Catsuits and pointy ears aside, Miss Fury is a unique take on the world’s first superheroine.  Writer Rob Williams concocted the surprise hit of the year–a book that might not have been on pull lists yet it was swiped off the store shelves every week as readers couldn’t get enough of the series.  Among many classic titles emerging from the publisher known for licensed works from the past like The Shadow, the Green Hornet, and the Bionic Man, Miss Fury is a non-stop, action-filled, fun read–it’s a comic book series that will remind you why you love comic books in the first place.

Layout 1

As a comic book artist that excels at the feminine form, Brazilian artist Jackson “Jack” Herbert is well on his way to becoming the next Adam Hughes.  His Marla Drake is a sophisticate back in the 1940s.  In 2013 she is a provocateur, an agent of an untrustworthy manipulator, murdering as he directs, because she believes she can save America from a dreadful alternative reality.

Continue reading

Grimm01-Cov-SubscriptionRevised

The first year of Dynamite Comics’ spin-off of NBC’s Grimm TV series has taken Nick Burkhardt, a cop and one of a family of Grimms who fight cloaked monsters living among us, and plucked him from his native Portland, Oregon of the TV series and spun him across Europe.  He’s in search of his mother, Kelly—also a Grimm–and three gold coins that have the power of influence akin to the One Ring in J.R.R. Tolkien’s Middle Earth books.  He’s brought along his partner, Detective Hank Griffin and Blutbad friend Monroe, and their quest to find Nick’s mom becomes woven into a political battle for control of the coins, first introduced in the TV series.

A whole bevy of writers, plot by Jim Kouf and David Greenwalt and script by Marc Gaffen and Kyle McVey, create a believable tale far away from the events in Portland in the series’ first eight issues.  This means the comic book is a true spin-off—it doesn’t interfere with the fact that Nick’s girlfriend had amnesia for most of the overlapping timeframe, or that Monroe’s girlfriend is away caring for a sick relative.  It also means the writers can introduce yet a third Grimm, a fighter named Maya who is a pawn of those elements that oppose Nick’s efforts.  Or is she after the coins, too?

Grimm01CovPhantom

An escape via a deep dive into an oceanic cave, chases through the streets of Spain and Italy, droves of attacking Wesen–all of these things would cost plenty for a TV series in location shoots and make-up expense, so the comic book medium allows an expansion in scope of the world of Grimm into corners that might not otherwise be easily visited.

Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 365 other followers

%d bloggers like this: