Tag Archive: IDW Publishing


Star Wars Artists Edition cover

Celebrating the twentieth anniversary of Star Wars: A New Hope and long before we had any guess about what might happen in the prequel trilogy, George Lucas, for good or bad, retooled all three episodes of the Star Wars trilogy into the Star Wars Special Edition theatrical release.  Between January and March 1997 the world got to “see the movies again for the first time” and was reminded where the word blockbuster actually came from.  Now Marvel Comics is following suit with its own look back to original Star Wars source material.

Marvel Comics is releasing two new versions of Roy Thomas and Howard Chaykin’s original six-issue adaptation of the original Star Wars.  This is the classic adaptation that saw its first chapter, Issue #1, released before the movie hit theaters.

The first volume is being released today: Star Wars: Episode IV: A New Hope.  The OGN is for “oversized graphic novel” but the value in this book is the restoration, George Lucas style, of Howard Chaykin’s original artwork via a replacement of Marie Severin’s original 1970s colors with Chris Sotomayor’s update of the six-issue movie adaptation into a more modern color scheme.  Adi Granov supplies the new cover art for this edition.  Marvel said it will soon release similar editions of its adaptations of The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi.  Check out a preview of the new look at a classic movie adaptation below.

Star Wars OGN cover

IDW Publishing and Marvel Comics announced this week a second treatment of the same Star Wars comic book adaptation.  The Star Wars Artist’s Edition will be consistent with past IDW “artist’s edition” offerings, showcasing the original comic book pencil and ink art behind the series in high quality color reprints of the original, giant-sized page format that the artists sketched the artwork.

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Star Trek Green Lantern The Spectrum War

So what would a Klingon do with a Green Lantern Corps power ring?  We’ll find out in July when IDW Publishing, CBS Consumer Products, and DC Comics team up to present the reboot Star Trek Enterprise crew and Hal Jordan and the Green Lantern Corps in Star Trek/Green Lantern: The Spectrum War.

Set in the 23rd century of the “new” Star Trek universe, the Federation and the “entire” Green Lantern Corps will team-up to protect the universe when some power rings gets in the hands of some familiar Star Trek antagonists.  Boldly going where no one has gone before…in brightest day, in blackest night… IDW revealed this weekend at WonderCon in Anaheim that the six-part monthly mini-series will be written by veteran Star Trek comic writer Mike Johnson with interior art by Arrow artist Angel Hernandez.

Green Lantern Star Trek The Spectrum War Francesco Francavilla

Look for some great variant covers in the series by artists Francesco Francavilla, Gabriel Rodriquez, Else Charretier, Garry Brown, Declan Shalvey, and Marc Laming.

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The X-Files Year Zero trade paperback   BOOM_BigConJob_001_A_Main

Something old, something new, and another issue of your favorite mash-up await you this Wednesday at your local comic book store.  The brilliant mini-series The X-Files: Year Zero gets a trade paperback release.  The series was borg.com‘s Best TV/Movie-Tie-in on last year’s Best of 2014 List.  Writer Jimmy Palmiotti, whose run on All-Star Western and his creator-owned Trigger Girl 6 rank among the top of our favorite comic book stories, has something completely new with his mini-series The Big Con Job.  Has-been classic TV actors on the convention circuit decide to band together to rob San Diego Comic-Con in this quirky new series.  And Issue #3 of IDW Publishing’s inspired crossover of classic Star Trek and Planet of the Apes, The Primate Directive is here.

If you’re a subscriber to the Star Trek/Apes series, check out this great cover coming your way:

Primate_Directive_issue_3_sub_cover Joe Corroney

First up, a look at The X-Files Year Zero trade paperback.  It includes a nice cover gallery of the great pulp covers that were variant covers for the mini-series.  After the break, check out all our previews:

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D4VE_01-pr-1    D4VE variant cover 1

It’s not every day a cool new mash-up comes your way.  When you think comedy meets sci-fi, Spaceballs, Galaxy Quest, Men in Black or Guardians of the Galaxy may come to mind.  Today IDW Publishing is releasing the first book in a new limited edition comic book series that has a new spin on sci-fi comedy, called D4VE.

D4VE (not D-A-V-E) is a robot in our future.  Hey–all good robots must have a number in their name.  (Ain’t that right, B-9, B-4, R2-D2, C-3PO, IG-88, and 4-LOM?)  D4VE is also everyman.  Or at least everyrobot.  And he’s going through a mid-life crisis.

D4VE excerpt

Imagine a world with a Planet of the Apes ending for mankind, but with humanoid robots left to run the show–as if that friendly android Chappie, from the coming film of the same name, is fruitful and multiplies and his kind decimate the Earth.  Only in a light-hearted way.

Check out a preview of Issue #1, after the break, courtesy of IDW Publishing.

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Orphan-Black1   orphan-black-issue-1-cover-2

Fans of the BBC America’s Orphan Black just can’t get enough of one of the best science fiction series around.  Tatiana Maslany, the series star who plays every variant of the show’s clones, has the toughest job on television, playing in nearly every scene of its first two seasons.  The “Clone Club”–the name of the show’s fans–has cheered the series into its third season, returning to TV this April.  Tomorrow, the Clone Club gets to pursue the further adventures of Sarah, Alison, Cosima, Helena and all the rest as Orphan Black, a new monthly comic book series, begins.

We’re read a review copy of Issue #1 and writers and show creators Graeme Manson and John Fawcett with Jody Houser have matched the voice of Sarah perfectly with Maslany’s character on TV.  In fact Issue #1 is a recap of sorts, an introduction to the characters and world of Orphan Black for those new to the series that made borg.com‘s Best of lists for 2013 and 2014.

OrphanBlack_01-pr_Page_1   orphan-black-issue-1-cover

Szymon Kudranski serves as series artist.  His style is very simple, yet his take on the characters easily evokes the images of the actors behind the roles.  As for variant covers, look for at least a dozen variants coming your way.

After the break, check out a preview of Issue #1, courtesy of IDW Publishing:

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Star Trek Apes cover

Scott and David Tipton have done it again.  They’re back with a new Star Trek series, but this time it’s a mash-up with Planet of the Apes.  And Issue #1 explains how it all comes together, and we’ve got a preview below.  Star Trek/Planet of the Apes: The Primate Directive, Issue #1, is now available at comic book stores everywhere from IDW Publishing.

Finally we get to see Sulu and Uhura on an away mission together, donning Klingon disguises.  It’s the classic Trek–images by Rachael Stott and Charlie Kirchoff of George Takei and Nichelle Nichols as opposed to the reboot actors John Cho and Zoe Saldana.  Yet the circumstances and action are updated and modern–storytelling like you’d see in the reboot series.  It works–great, in fact.

Trek Apes cover

So how does the starship Enterprise (the original, not the bloody A, B, C, or D) find its way into a universe where apes rule Earth’s future?  You’ll have to pick up Issue #1 to find out.  Meanwhile, check out this preview, courtesy of IDW Publishing, after the break.

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Phil Noto Black Widow

The last day of the year is finally here, and with that the last of our reviews of the best content of 2014.

We’ve previewed comic books each month thanks to publishers like Dynamite Comics, Dark Horse Comics, IDW Publishing, BOOM! Studios, and Image.  We sample the best of all that Marvel and DC Comics has to offer, too, and although we don’t have enough time to review everything we review those titles we think our readers might like to check out, especially those with a sci-fi, fantasy, or retro angle.  And we read plenty of books–sci-fi and fantasy, pulp and spy novels, movie and TV tie-ins, even Westerns and steampunk, as well as non-fiction books about movies, TV, and other genre topics.  This past month we have looked again at these titles, as we narrowed our selections to what we think are the very best.  So here are our picks for Best in Print for 2014.

Black-Widow-5

Best Comic Book Series — Black Widow, Marvel Comics.  We were wondering early on what would take the place of Fraction and Hollingsworth’s Hawkeye series for the most satisfying superhero fix.  It didn’t take long to see this other Marvel series looking at another superhero in a similarly personal–but very different–way.  It was a standout in a great year of comics.  Phil Noto’s art and colors were incredible and Nathan Edmondson’s story didn’t let up once.  Full of action, espionage, and intrigue.  A great series to catch-up on in a trade edition.  See our reviews of the series here and here.

AfterlifeWithArchie_07-0

Best Comic Book Mini-Series — Afterlife with Archie, Archie Comics.  Who would have guessed someone could make Archie and friends so accessible to any demographic in the 2010s?  And whose brilliant idea was doing it via a horror genre story of zombies taking over Riverdale?  Smart writing by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa and spooky atmospheric illustrations by Francesco Francavilla made for a sumptuous series like no other.  Not technically a mini-series, it feels like one because of its staggered release.  See our earlier raves about the series here.

Wilds End issue 1

Best Comic Book Writing – Dan Abnett, Wild’s End, BOOM! Studios.  Abnett’s Wild’s End really caught us by surprise.  An incredible fantasy read that is truly unique from BOOM! Studios.  Anthropomorphic characters with incredible archaic dialogue that’s witty and smart.  A crazy mash-up of War of the Worlds, Christopher Robin’s neighborhood, and the dark edge and high stakes of Revival.  We can’t wait to see what’s in store for the rest of this series.  Check out our earlier review here.

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X-Files X-mas Special cover A

Review by C.J. Bunce

The X-Files Season 10 is one of IDW Publishing’s best series, following Mulder and Scully and friends in their ongoing exploits following the TV series and two films.  The spin-off mini-series The X-Files: Year Zero followed Mulder and Scully in the present day as they pursue a case first investigated by the original keepers of the FBI’s X-Files, Bing Ellinson and Minnie Ohio.  This year both of these series shared a combination of good storytelling, evocative imagery, and familiarity of the well-loved characters that made for required reading for genre fans.

This week IDW is releasing a rare, prestige format holiday one-shot: The X-Files X-mas Special.  It includes two unrelated stories, one about Mulder and Scully in the present day, and a second about the 1940s’ duo and their encounter with a creepy character that very well could be the vile holiday elf Krampus.

X-Files X-mas Special cover B

The first story, “Season 10 Greetings,” comes from the creative team of writer Joe Harris, artist Matthew Dow Smith, and colorist Jordie Bellaire.  The 1940s FBI team story “Merry Christmas, Comrade!” was written by Karl Kesel, with art by Matthew Southworth, and colors by Matheus Lopes.

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ST-CEF03-coverSUB    star-trek-city-edge-forever-ellison-idw-cover-juan-ortiz

The background of the making of the classic Star Trek episode The City on the Edge of Forever has been discussed over and over among Star Trek insiders and fandom.  Harlan Ellison wrote the screenplay, which was carved up so much in Ellison’s view, that over the past four decades Ellison was vocal in rejecting Gene Roddenberry’s final version that first made it to television screens on April 6, 1967.

What would the original version have looked like had Roddenberry stuck closer to the original script?  It’s the kind of thing you would have thought fan film creators would have jumped at before now, but–even better–Star Trek fans can now see The City on the Edge of Forever visually portrayed in its originally conceived form.

Woodward Edith Keeler IDW

IDW Publishing partnered the Star Trek writing team of Scott Tipton and David Tipton with the best Star Trek artist around, J.K. Woodward, and this year they adapted Ellison’s original screenplay into a five-issue comic book series that wraps this month, and will soon be released in a hardcover and trade edition.  If you think that a comic book cannot convey everything you’d want to see from the original Star Trek, then you haven’t seen the photo-real artistry of J.K. Woodward.

In fact the single biggest reason to read The City on the Edge of Forever is J.K. Woodward’s panel after panel of beautiful paintings– renderings of not just the characters but William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, Joan Collins, and Grace Lee Whitney–that will have your mind’s eye believing you just watched an actual episode of the original series.

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LTPC_Volume_3_Cover    superman_ga_sundays_2_pr

Philosopher George Santayana once said, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it,” and so revisiting history via its primary sources should be no less important in studying the history of comics and animation.  And with the benefit of our own personal wayback machines (spelled WABAC for you Mr. Peabody fans) sometimes our looks to the past are full of imagery and stories that make us squirm as our sensibilities have improved over time.

We visited this concept here at borg.com with our review of the even-too-sexist-for-a-Bond-novel The Spy Who Loved Me and racism-heavy Live and Let Die.  Can you still enjoy these works knowing how skewed the world view was?  I think the answer can be yes, as long as you maintain your critical eye and acknowledge the improvements we have made.  Ignoring or dismissing these works outright would be worse.

Thanks to the folks at Warner Bros. we previewed a copy of Looney Tunes–Platinum Collection, Volume 3, on Blu-ray, and courtesy of IDW Publishing we have a preview for you of Superman: The Golden Age Sundays (1946-1949), after the break.

Gossamer and Bugs

Who doesn’t remember and cherish the great Looney Tunes cartoons of the mid-20th century, recycled decades after their creation for a 1970s and 1980s cable viewing audience thanks to Saturday morning cartoons?  But, like many comic books and superhero movies today, you might use discretion before sharing with young audiences.  Even the originals were intended for adult movie audiences and it’s amazing networks thought these were once appropriate for kids each Saturday.  And where you may think you watched these cartoons and turned out fine and bigot-free, what about that guy across the street?

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