Dont Smile

The gold old days.  Life was simpler then.  Back then we didn’t have the Internet.

Every generation looks back with a sense of nostalgia for those artifacts of a time long ago.  Yet in contemporary times you wouldn’t have thought we’d ever look back one day with any positive thoughts.  Real typewriters, not the electric ones, that gave your fingers early stage arthritis.  A pick-up truck with manual steering that gave your arms a workout every time you made a turn.  The vibrant, eye-popping scent of mimeograph machines and the purple ink that wouldn’t wash off your skin.  The sting of mercurochrome on an open wound.  Ah… the good old days.

Then there are those things that really do carry nothing but positive feelings.  Back in between 1959 and 1972, Fisher Price released toys for little kids wanting their own high-tech fun.  If you’re like us here at borg.com, you remember playing with most of these as a kid.  In reality these toys were low-tech, yet, if the gift recipient was young enough these toys really were a hit.  They have vanished for decades but are back now, and in time for your Black Friday gift buying quest.

Classic camera toy

If your kid is old enough where he has his own xBox and iPhone, don’t bother with these.  These are for kids who haven’t been tempted by those zombie toys of the adult set.  So here they all are: the 1966 High-Def television, the 1959 iPod, the 1961 smart phone, the 1969 electronic keyboard, the 1968 digital SLR, the 1972 iPad, and the 1971 CD player.  You don’t remember an iPod in 1959?  Maybe Fisher Price didn’t use these terms back then, but maybe current kids would have the same fun with the appropriate spin on what they were playing with.

Here’s your post-modern online retro toy catalog to save you some time at the holidays, with our own added updated names, available at discount prices from Amazon.com. Click on each photo for details.

The Original Smart Phone

1961 Chatter Phone

1961 Chatter Phone

Early HDTV 

1966 Two-Tune TV

1966 Two-Tune TV

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