Archive for April, 2015


Lip Sync Battle Dwayne Johnson The Rock

No surprise here. You know what you’re going to get with the show’s title: Lip Sync Battle.  Jimmy Fallon’s Tonight Show lip sync contests where he faces off against everyone from Will Farrell to Emma Stone are the stuff of viral videos now.  So it was a smart move for him to lead up a team of producers and Saturday Night Live’s Beth McCarthy-Miller as show director to feature a cable show that spun-off this segments into its own gig.

Spike TV started its new “reality competition” series off this week right, featuring the king of lip sync, the goofy, give-it-all-you-got Fallon against the larger than life charisma of Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson.  LL Cool J serves as the host of the show, with co-host/Spike eye candy model Chrissy Teigen.

Both trash talked each other throughout the show with plenty of good humor.  The prize for each episode is a giant boxing belt and midway through battle one Fallon offered up a pint-sized version for Johnson.

LL Cool J Jimmy Fallon Lip Sync Battle

Johnson’s songs were Taylor Swift’s “Shake it Off” up against Fallon’s take on Harry Belafonte’s “Jump in the Line” song from Beetlejuice.  Fallon upped the ante by taking the audience into a Conga line.  But the second round was the big production, with Fallon first up, syncing Madonna’s “Like a Prayer” with a back-up choir.  But you just can’t beat Johnson sporting John Travolta’s trademark duds from Saturday Night Fever, syncing the Bee Gee’s “Staying Alive.”  Both the stars really seemed to give it their all.

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Mouse Guard 1

Last weekend at Emerald City Comicon in Seattle, Archaia, the imprint from BOOM! Studios announced the forthcoming release of The Art of Mouse Guard 2005-2015.  The over-sized hardcover will chronicle a decade of writer/artist David Petersen’s award-winning series about a group of medieval warrior mice.

Better yet, the coffee table style book is printed in a 12-inch x 12-inch format–the same size in which Petersen rendered the original images of his Mouse Guard series in pencil and ink, so fans will be able to see the full-sized artwork as it originally appeared.  The series was originally published in a 8×8 format–making it unique among comic book works.

Mouse Guard 2

Winner of both Eisner and Harvey awards, Mouse Guard is a one-of-a-kind fantasy universe that we reviewed previously at borg.com here and discussed extensively here.

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Sherlock-Christmas-Special-Images-Featuring-Benedict-Cumberbatch-and-Martin-Freeman1

Like all good things that get a hold on generations of audiences, Arthur Conan Doyle’s master detective Sherlock Holmes has been interpreted and re-interpreted over and over.  For more than 110 years, Holmes and his trusty companion Dr. Watson have appeared in more than 200 movies that adapted Doyle’s original stories–more than 70 actors have played Holmes–the most of any fictional character on-screen according to the folks at the Guinness Book of World Records.  Interest has never waned, and every new detective show and police procedural seems to borrow something from him, much like all science fiction seems to borrow something from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.  Batman was inspired by Holmes 75 years ago, and more recently TV series characters like Adrian Monk, Shawn Spencer, and Dr. Gregory House all were inspired incarnations of the character.

Modern Sherlock Cumberbatch as early Sherlock

Holmes was no bigger than with Robert Downey, Jr. and Jude Law’s blockbuster films, Sherlock Holmes in 2009 and Sherlock Holmes: Game of Shadows in 2011.  In that franchise director Guy Ritchie opted to showcase Holmes from Doyle’s original stories in his original setting of Victorian England.

Rivaling that series of movies after three seasons is BBC’s Sherlock, starring Benedict Cumberbatch as Holmes and Martin Freeman as Dr. John Watson.  Here creators Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat take Holmes in a completely new direction, present day London, including the clever incorporation of modern technology into Holmes’s sleuthing.  Despite the updated setting Sherlock borrows the spirit of Holmes faithfully from Doyle’s stories.

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Veronica Mars

Review by C.J. Bunce

For fans of Rob Thomas and Jennifer Graham’s first tie-in novel Veronica Mars: The Thousand Dollar Tan Line, previously reviewed here at borg.com, the next novel in the paperback series will get readers even closer to the Veronica of the TV series.  Veronica Mars: Mr. Kiss and Tell, is a darker mystery, a hard-boiled detective story, straight out of the hard case crime series of the past.  Mr. Kiss and Tell also continues to show the growth of Veronica, now a 29-year-old with responsibilities after she ditched her law career for a P.I. agency gig with her dad.

Nobody knows Veronica better than creator Rob Thomas.  The banter, the snarky quips, the Whedon-esque pop culture references all make for a story that is not only consistent with the TV series and 2014 crowdfunded movie, but it remains fresh, taking Veronica into new territory.  Thomas and Graham waste no time, providing a powerful beginning:  A junk dealer happens upon what could be a mannequin as he is roaming the city.  Only it’s a woman, barely alive, and we’ll learn she’s from a family that will be familiar to Veronica Mars fans.  Veronica is hired by a hotel to prove that a hotel employee was not the attacker and rapist that left the young woman for dead.  But if he didn’t do it, then who did?

Mars Mr Kiss and Tell logo

Veronica has a long history with solving rape cases, cases that became almost a hallmark of her series.  This case will take her into the seedy parts of society, with Veronica barreling into danger reminding us that, however well-intentioned, she often makes poor choices.  Here she ends up in a hotel with a prostitute and her pimp–a giant thug who makes Veronica an offer that could end her case quickly–but it’s also an offer she should refuse.  But will she?  Has she changed at all?

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