Tag Archive: Star Trek 50th anniversary


USS Discovery Star Trek 2016 take off

Surprising fans at San Diego Comic-Con this afternoon, CBS revealed the second teaser for the next Star Trek television series.  It’s called Star Trek: Discovery, and like Star Trek Voyager before it, it will focus on another ship of the Starfleet line.  USS Discovery NCC-1031 will be the talk of Star Trek fans everywhere next year.

The ship, shown taking flight in the preview, borrows from concept drawings dating back between the original series and the movies.  It has a very modern look seen in both Star Trek Into Darkness, Star Trek Beyond, and even Enterprise, but also carries that sleek look of Voyager.  And from beneath it even sports the sprawl of a classic Klingon ship.  But this is the new look of Starfleet’s best.  And it looks pretty good.

USS Discovery Comic Con clip

This appears to be a classic design lending some credence to the rumor that the series will take place after Star Trek VI:  The Undiscovered Country.  David Semel will direct the first episode.  Showrunner Bryan Fuller was joined on the panel this afternoon by William Shatner, Scott Bakula, Michael Dorn, Jeri Ryan, and Brent Spiner

Straight from Comic-Con, check out this trailer for Star Trek: Discovery:

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Star Trek Book 2016

The in-universe book can be found in all sorts of genres.  In Star Trek we’ve seen this type of book recently with Star Trek Federation: The First 150 Years and The Autobiography of James T. Kirk.  You’re either a fan of this type of work or you aren’t–these books attempt to take readers deeper into the world and stories of our favorite characters.  More than found in the basic canon, in a way that often seems less imaginative than something like a tie-in novel.  Rarely have we read this type that knocked our socks off.  An exception is DK’s Star Trek: A Visual Dictionary–a simple but enjoyable look inside all facets of Star Trek (reviewed here previously at borg.com).  A new in-universe book by DK qualifies as a good read and maybe even a great Star Trek work.

The Star Trek Book celebrates 50 years of Star Trek with what amounts to a school textbook from Star Trek’s future.  Detailing the lives of key players in the Federation, chronicling major events, technologies, cultures, and locales, The Star Trek Book lives up to its promise.  The chronicle itself is brilliantly executed.  Not simply a time period by time period account, such as taking each series one by one, instead this account weaves the facts and features of all series and movies together as a singular whole.  This makes for a reference you won’t simply read and file away on the shelf, but one you keep coming back to (as we have in the weeks since we got a first look at the book).

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The reboot universe of Star Trek, here designated for the first time as the Kelvin timeline, is handled alongside the original series cast and stories.  The Enterprise series is intermingled with Star Trek: The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, and Star Trek Voyager, and the key events from the movies, all in a way that finally gives each component equal coverage.  So fans of one or all the series will find something of interest here.

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ST Beyond Enterprise

We’ve seen Kirk and Spock duke it out for screen time over the years, both getting their own scenes where they sacrifice all for their crew.  Isn’t it time Bones gets the spotlight?  Will the next film be the one to put the ship’s doctor to the test?

We have been fans of all the Star Trek television series and movies from day one.  In this 50th year of Star Trek, the franchise catches up to the benchmark only recently passed by Doctor Who and James Bond.  Even the bottom of the Star Trek catalog is better than the best of many other franchises.   That bottom is in the eye of the beholder.  For many its Star Trek V: The Final Frontier.  For others it is Deep Space Nine or Enterprise.  Whatever your view, it’s sure to spark a conversation (and controversy) among Star Trek fans.

Next year a new streaming weekly series will no doubt clear the way for more chatter among fans like we saw when Star Trek: The Motion Picture was first released, when Star Trek: The Next Generation first aired, and the pilot of each series thereafter.  And of course the J.J. Abrams reboot films spurred its own schism between the fan base.   But for good or bad we’ll keep coming back and find something awesome about every new image of Star Trek on the big or small screen.

ST Beyond

Paramount has released several TV spots in the past few days that provide even more glimpses at an Enterprise under attack, our familiar crew, and new aliens and villains.  Check them out, after the break:

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Star Trek Book 2016

The 50th anniversary celebration of Star Trek is in full swing and you can hardly visit a store without encountering a new collectable commemorating the event.  From the publishing realm, coming this summer from Dorling Kindersley (DK) books is a new book that purports to be the last word on all of Star Trek–from the original series to the latest big screen releases.  Titled boldly The Star Trek Book, it’s a 336 page data trove for those new to Star Trek and others wanting a quick reminder of some of their favorite characters, places, ships, and weapons.

You can pre-order your copy now at a discount off the cover price here from Amazon.com.  It seems to be similar in design to the classic Star Trek The Magazine from years ago.

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Here’s the description from the publisher followed by several preview pages released this month by Amazon:

Celebrate 50 years of one of the longest running and beloved sci-fi franchises with The Star Trek Book.  This comprehensive guide to the series delves into the myriad worlds and different dimensions visited by the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise.

Discover the amazing science of Star Trek and how it has influenced real-world technology such as flip phones.  Featuring informative and analytical text combined with exciting photography and infographics throughout, The Star Trek Book is broken down into main categories such as science and technology, Starfleet, allies and enemies, and more.

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cover_template_text    STII vinyl

The great composer James Horner died last year in a plane crash, leaving behind a legacy of some of the biggest and most memorable soundtracks that defined nearly 40 years of film history.  One of the most memorable for sci-fi fans is his score to Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan.  To celebrate Star Trek’s 50th anniversary, Mondo–the guys known for their redux poster interpretations–are releasing an extended LP edition of Wrath of Khan with music never before available on vinyl.  And the release includes Mondo’s killer level of artwork interpreting Khan and Kirk on Ceti Alpha V and the Genesis Planet.

But Mondo didn’t stop there.  The vinyl albums reflect the look and colors of the Mutara Nebula, where the Enterprise and the Reliant faced off.

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Horner’s work on Wrath of Khan is impressive and established Horner as a major film composer.  His score adapts themes from Prokofiev’s Alexander Nevsky and Romeo and Juliet, and Horner would work cues from classical masters in many of his film scores over the course of his career.  Order your copy of Horner’s Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan 2-LP set today here at the Mondo shop.

Never heard of James Horner?  You certainly have heard his work.  His last score will be featured in the remake of The Magnificent Seven due in theaters September 23, 2016, but the variety of films he wrote for is unprecedented.  He wrote themes that made many an actor look good–many in multiple films, including Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sigourney Weaver, Mel Gibson, Harrison Ford, Matthew Broderick, Russell Crowe, Jennifer Connelly, Ed Harris, Denzel Washington, Julia Roberts, and Brad Pitt, and collaborated on movies with the likes of big filmmakers, including Ron Howard, Steven Spielberg, James Cameron, Ridley Scott, Phil Alden Robinson, Wolfgang Petersen, Jean-Jacques Annaud, Michael Apted, Joe Johnston, and Edward Zwick.

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