Tag Archive: Black Dog & Leventhal


Review by C.J. Bunce

I always figure second grade is the make or break year for kids.  It’s the best opportunity to reveal all the components of the world to them before they follow along with the crowd into the next “in” thing.  When I was in second grade I had chicken pox, and my teacher provided me with a stack of books to read at home for the next two weeks.  One was about Easter Island, one was about King Tutankhamen, one was about Thor Heyerdahl, and the rest were about space exploration.  Just in time for your kids–or you, should outer space be a recent passion for you–is an updated edition of Marcus Chown’s Solar System: A Visual Exploration of All the Planets, Moons, and Other Heavenly Bodies That Orbit Our Sun, available now here at Amazon, a survey of the subject for amateur astronomers.

At a minimum, this book should be in every school and public library.

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Review by C.J. Bunce

The incredible, beautiful, buzzing bee is the subject of a new guide book from Running Press books.  Lela Nargi’s The Book of Bees is the perfect overview for kids and adults alike, highlighting 40 key varieties of the insect family.  Can’t tell the difference between yellowjackets and bees?  Want to know how bees function and interact with each other and why only some produce honey?  Beginning with the biology of the bee, readers dive into honeybees, who, like dogs and cats, have been domesticated by humans for thousands of years.  Many species are also endangered and some have become extinct–this book will get readers on the pathway to understanding what they can do about it.

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Review by C.J. Bunce

Some people are fans of glow-in-the-dark things.  Other are fans of all things 3D.  Theodore Gray, author of a series of books on The ElementsMolecules, and Reactions (and builder of the wooden periodic table) has added another dive into familiar objects and how they got that way.  In How Things Work: The Inner Life of Everyday Machines, Gray reveals his fascination for all things transparent, as he rummages through a lifetime of collecting ordinary objects with a not-so-ordinary history.  Along his journey he provides the high points on how some of the most commonly used machines in your home work.  The book is available here at Amazon.
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