Tag Archive: Bob Q


Legendary artist Frank Cho is back this month with a new way to get your hands on an exclusive run of a variant comic book cover design he created for Dynamite Entertainment’s ongoing Red Sonja series.  Initially part of an earlier crowdfunding campaign, Dynamite has just opened up the opportunity for anyone to get their hands on one of four styles of Cho’s beautiful rendition of the famous “She-Devil with a Sword,” with color work supplied by frequent Cho collaborator Sabine Rich.  According to Cho, “When Dynamite asked me to draw the Red Sonja cover, I jumped at the chance.  Who doesn’t love a redhead with a sword?  The cover will show Red Sonja at her best – power and beauty.  My goal is to make her look strong, classic, timeless and iconic.”  This limited time opportunity also provides the opportunity to purchase other collectibles featuring this definitive image of Red Sonja.

Continue reading

Review by C.J. Bunce

Heroes of the past unite for a third time under Dynamite Entertainment management, as the trade paperback edition of The Lone Ranger: The Devil’s Rope hits the stands this week.  It’s 1887 in rural Texas, and wealthy landowners who have pressed Indian interests off their native lands are now doing the same for the farmer and rancher.  Their method?  Illegally taking lands and establishing boundaries with barbed wire, while influencing political interests to allow the illegitimate squatters to shoot to kill if anyone cuts the wire on “their” lands.  Sounds like a good time for a hero.

Enter The Lone Ranger, disturbed at lunch by a stampede caused by the first shots in the conflict.  The first murder is an excuse to enlist another hero from his past, Tonto, to help him confront the heavy tide of “progress.”  Writer Mark Russell (The Snagglepuss Chronicles, The Flintstones) incorporates an innovative technological marvel to build a simple, classic Western tale of frontier America.  Equal to the writing is the artwork by the artist known as Bob Q, whose simplicity echoes the barren landscapes his characters are fighting to protect.  The artist’s best feat is the expressions of his characters.  Black hat villains are easy to hate, and provide fodder for some sporting Texas Ranger justice by the original dynamic duo.  Lettering is provided by Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou.

You won’t find a lot of bold vision or layered storytelling here compared to past stories of The Lone Ranger, but you will find a good, easy read, reflecting plenty of truths of the robber baron era, the struggle of Americans to build a nation, and pulp and cinema heroes who never grow old.  Readers of recent Jonah Hex and Zorro stories will likely enjoy the style and story in this book.  It also has bits of action and villains like you’ve met before in 3:10 to Yuma, The Magnificent Seven, and Django Unchained.

Here is a 12-page preview of the 138-page trade edition of The Lone Ranger: The Devil’s Rope, courtesy of Dynamite Entertainment:

Continue reading

Review by C.J. Bunce

World War II is definitely a theme in popular culture these days.  Only in the past week we had a preview of Archie 1941, then a preview for Season 3 of The Man in the High Castle, and now a 1941 story featuring everyone’s favorite master spy.  James Bond is a young man trying to survive the Clydesbank Blitz in Scotland in the first origin tale of Bond years before his memorable stint in Her Majesty’s Secret Service in the new comic book series Ian Fleming’s James Bond Origin.  Issue #1 arrives Wednesday at comic book stores everywhere.  We meet the orphan Bond as a young adult, eager to learn more about his parents, already able to teach fellow students a course in judo, and eager to grab onto the coattails and seek the advice of the professors he has access to.

Written by Jeff Parker (Suicide Squad, Fantastic Four) with artwork by Bob Q (The Lone Ranger) and lettering by Simon Bowland (Plastic Man), the first issue of the story has the same feel of an untouchable oppressor from the sky as H.G. Wells’ War of the Worlds.  Full of the action level we know from the Bond movies, the story is waiting for the hero to step in and take over.  How is James Bond of March 11, 1941 different than the Bond with the 00 status?  He has some rudimentary skills, he has the desire to learn, but he doesn’t have the confidence just yet.

   

The Clydesbank Blitz is the most  destructive attack by the Germans on Scotland, and Bond finds himself right in the middle of it.  The new series will be released this week with seven cover variants, with artwork by artists John Cassaday, David Mack, Kev Walker, Gene Ha, Ibrahim Moustafa, and Bob Q with Jordan Boyd.

Check out a preview from Issue #1 and all the covers (above and below):

Continue reading