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Tag Archive: Ellen Burstyn


Lively Age of Adaline

Review by C.J. Bunce

A different kind of time trip awaits you.  The Age of Adaline didn’t do much to promote the presence of Harrison Ford as a key character in this supernatural fantasy romance that hit theaters only last year.  Yet it’s one film that Harrison Ford fans–even those who may not normally go for a romance movie–will not want to miss.  Recognized as a Peoples’ Choice Award nominee for Favorite Dramatic Movie, but otherwise not making much of a blip on the radar of moviegoers, The Age of Adaline presents a solid fantasy story even if we’ve seen the subject matter before.

Blake Lively takes center stage as Adaline Bowman, a woman who was seemingly killed in an accident in the 1930s at the age of 29.  Yet instead of staying dead, a bit of mystical intervention causes her to no longer age.  She is left exactly like Ioan Gruffudd’s Dr. Henry Morgan in the ABC TV series Forever–to struggle with being immortal, for no apparent reason, and without any answers.  Those around her continue to age, and she avoids relationships so she will not be found-out and used for some eager scientist’s experiments into the secrets of eternal youth.  Like Morgan’s older looking son played by Judd Hirsch in Forever, Adaline, too, has an older looking child, played by Ellen Burstyn posing as Adaline’s grandmother.

The-Age-of-Adeline-ford

Despite the familiar territory, the pleasant cast–including Orphan Black and Game of Thrones’ Michael Huisman, who plays Adaline’s kind and earnest boyfriend Ellis, and Ford as Ellis’s father–gives viewers an enchanting new take on the trope.  Lively manages to balance a sweet romance between Adaline and Ellis and another character, and the writers (three in all) avoid the typical love triangle this story could have easily taken.  Ford provides some solid dramatic acting work, one of his best, most understated performances in years.  The result is a good romance fantasy that is easy to recommend to any audience.

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By C.J. Bunce

Once in a while I get gifts of food in the mail from nice people.  I’ve received frozen turkeys, frozen cupcakes, frozen brownies, cold-packed chocolates.  Food is good.  Food as gifts from friends is even better.

So today the Fed Ex man delivers an unexpected package to my doorstep:

PERISHABLE, TIME AND TEMPERATURE SENSITIVE, OPEN IMMEDIATELY.  I picked it up.  It was not cold like you’d think something cold-packed would be.  Someone sent me brownies!  But its warm… melted?  Lame.

So I brought it into the house.  And the first instance of creepiness sank in.  It wasn’t brownies.

Jefferson Institute.  Coma Patient Care You Can Trust?  Again… not brownies.  The container in the box had a disturbing shape.  I’d seen these on countless medical shows on TV.  For a second there I was hesitant to pull the container out of the box.  But I did.

At this point I was thinking.  No way.  Ohnotheydidn’t.  Not actually send me a… human organ… but set this whole marketing thing up?  This is bordering on brilliant.  Genius even.  At this point I knew this had to do with the new Coma TV mini-series I’d heard about at Comic-Con and received the strange brochure with a crazy scribbled remark across it:

But again, I was taken aback for a second.  So what the heck is in the container?  Fake heart prop? (Chocolate heart prop?)

The screener!  This has to be the most brilliant screener package ever.  Kudos for the marketing firm that talked someone into this campaign.  Bravo!

So a little background.  Once upon a time there was a movie called Coma.  It starred Genevieve Bujold in arguably her best career performance as a determined but naive doctor who stumbled upon an excessive number of comas resulting from patients having routine surgeries in OR 8 of the hospital she worked in.  Michael Douglas played a doctor she worked with, the great actor Richard Widmark played the evil chief of surgery, and Elizabeth Ashley played the equally vile administrator of a cold, chilling coma patient center called the Jefferson Institute.  And Tom Selleck played one of the poor bastards that ended up dead as a doornail by movie’s end.

The Jefferson Institute stuck with me.  It was the stuff of nightmares.  I will never have surgery in a room called OR 8.  Elizabeth Ashley’s “Mrs. Emerson” was right up there with Margaret Hamilton’s Wicked Witch of the West, only creepier because this was the real-world kind of creepy stuff.  Heck, I once didn’t apply for a job at a company because the offices looked like the Jefferson Institute.

Flash forward to working as managing editor for The Journal of Corporation Law.  We all were a little creeped out by the agreed subject of the annual symposium issue.  It was about the business and future of human organs–redistribution of donor organs and the like:

I remember reading the line above: “Other proposed procurement schemes, however, such as market sales and conscription, either currently are proscribed by law or are likely to encounter significant constitutional impediments.”  Creepy subject.  Reminded me of Coma.  (Insert hair standing up on back of neck here).

Suffice it to say, with my memory of the original series, I am definitely the audience for this marketing campaign.

So yes, of course, coming soon at borg.com, look for a preview of the A&E Network mini-series, Coma, by Ridley and Tony Scott, based on Robin Cook’s novel and Michael Crichton’s screenplay for the original movie Coma, with big name actors like Richard Dreyfuss (Jaws, Close Encounters of the Third Kind), Geena Davis (Beetlejuice, The Fly, Fletch), Ellen Burstyn (Poliitcal Animals, The Exorcist, Into Thin Air) as Mrs. Emerson, James Rebhorn (White Collar), and James Woods (John Carpenter’s Vampires), starring Lauren Ambrose (Law and Order, Torchwood), Steven Pasquale (Rescue Me), Joseph Mazzello (Jurassic Park, G.I. Joe: Retaliation) and Michael Weston (House, M.D.).

Meanwhile, check out comaconspiracy.com and jeffersoninstitute.com for some cool tie-ins.