Advertisements

Tag Archive: Ennio Morricone


Hateful Eight trailer

We’ll have plenty of reasons to see The Hateful Eight next year.  Quentin Tarentino has a measured pace releasing his movies and you never know whether the next film will really be his last.  He’s filmed this Western in 70 mm Panavision so it should play well on the big screen.  He’s hired Ennio Morricone, composer of the scores for A Fistful of Dollars, For a Few Dollars More, The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, for the ultimate throwback feel.

We get to see one of our favorite genre actors–Kurt Russell–in yet another tough-guy role.  We’ll hopefully add John “The Hangman” Ruth to the likes of Jack Burton and Snake Plissken.  Jennifer Jason Leigh provides a rare appearance–the actress who rarely gets leading roles and is said to have turned down many a role to be made famous by others.  And then we have the next Samuel L. Jackson performance, which we always can bank on.

Hateful Eight comic-Con SDCC 2015 poster Tarentino

This has neither the look of the classic Western nor the modern Western like Clint Eastwood’s Unforgiven.  This is equal parts 1960s spaghetti Western and something very modern.

Check out the first preview released for The Hateful Eight: 

Continue reading

Advertisements

Hateful Eight comic-Con SDCC 2015 poster Tarentino

No film footage or panel footage has yet hit the Interwebs, but meanwhile Quentin Tarentino released the above, beautiful, retro-Western style poster to promote his 2016 release, The Hateful Eight, in advance of his panel at San Diego Comic-Con today.

But the bigger news is that he disclosed that iconic composer Ennio Morricone will be creating the score for the film, his first Western movie score in more than 40 years.  Morricone is known best for Western film classics A Fistful of Dollars, For a Few Dollars More, The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, Once Upon a Time in the West, and Two Mules for Sister Sara.  More recently he’s covered every other genre, including scores for Footloose, John Carpenter’s The Thing, Red Sonja, Once upon a Time in America, Cinema Paradiso, The Untouchables, Wolf, Mission to Mars, and Tarentino’s Inglourious Basterds.

Hateful Eight cast

Look for The Hateful Eight in theaters January 8, 2016.

C.J. Bunce
Editor
borg.com

Django Unchained - Still A

By C.J. Bunce

How does a Western get nominated for a Best Picture Academy Award in 2013? As recently as two years ago the remake of True Grit was nominated for Best Picture and nine other nominations—but did not net a single win.  But would it have been nominated if it hadn’t been directed by the quirky directing duo of Joel and Ethan Coen?  Five years earlier Brokeback Mountain, a film with a Western—or at least a cowboy– theme was also nominated for Best Picture, winning three of eight nominations.  It took director Ang Lee and a completely non-Western plot for that to happen.  Then you have to go back to Unforgiven in 1992, which actually won Best Picture and four of nine of its nominations, to find the last major, critically acclaimed Western.

What made Unforgiven win?  Certainly by supplying one of the two most popular Western actors of all time as the film’s lead helped, even if it was one of his more bland performances, with Clint Eastwood also serving as director. (Yes, John Wayne still remains the #1 most popular Western actor ever).  But more importantly, like the few notable Westerns since, it had a very non-standard plot for a Western.  With its gunfighter-turns-farmer-turns-gunfighter-one-last-time story, it was basically a dark sequel to John Wayne’s Angel and the Badman.  You could keep going—back to Dances with Wolves in 1990, an example of the “epic Western” which seemed to reward the director and acting efforts of rising star Kevin Costner more than the movie as a Western genre masterpiece.  Or back to Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid in 1969, probably the last classic era Western to be nominated for a Best Picture Oscar, winning five awards, including a key win for the script by William Goldman.  Then go back to the also-quirky Cat Ballou in 1965 starring Jane Fonda—the rare Western notable for featuring a female lead.

Going back even further gets you into the classic era of Westerns, and throws you into the strange era of “epic Westerns” getting recognized by the Academy.  These were movies that in hindsight are really not as well done as many smaller pictures of the period, but their huge all-star casts and expensive sets made the films hard to ignore, such as How the West Was Won, The Alamo, and Giant.  Surprisingly you have to look back to the adaptation of Louis L’Amour’s Hondo starring John Wayne in 1953 to get back to the era of the “hero Western” as recipient of an Academy nod, a film up there with Shane and High Noon as successful and admired Westerns receiving acclaim by the Academy.

Schultz and Django

But if you put aside the classic Western and look at what has been selected by the Academy since the 1960s it makes a lot of sense that Quentin Tarentino’s Django Unchained is not only a Best Picture nominee this year, but a real contender for the win.  Set in the South two years before the Civil War, the film follows a slave named Django (Jamie Foxx) whose past owners lead him to meet up with German-born, dentist-turned-bounty hunter Dr. King Schultz (Christoph Waltz).  Schultz’s next target is the wanted-dead-or-alive Brittle brothers, and only Django can help him literally recognize his bounty.  Schultz serves as mentor in survival and pursuit skills for Django who is squarely focused on rescuing long-lost wife Broomhilda (Kerry Washington).  The search ultimately leads to a more complicated than necessary scheme to buy Broomhilda from infamous plantation owner Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio), if only his loyal house slave Stephen (Samuel L. Jackson) will not stand in the way.

So what is the formula for a successful Western in the 21st century and why should Django Unchained make the cut?

Continue reading