Tag Archive: Katherine Ross


If you walk through a list of the most distinctive and memorable voices of working actors in Hollywood, you’re likely to come up with James Earl Jones and Morgan Freeman.  One actor that belongs on the list is someone you may not think of.  Then you hear that gravelly baritone and know the voice immediately:  Sam Elliot.  As leading men go, he has a mesmerizing voice in the same class as the resonating tonal quality found in actresses Katherine Turner, Adrienne Barbeau, and the late Suzanne Pleshette.  He’s even been the voice of Smokey the Bear for the past decade.  But it’s not just the voice.  It’s that mustache and that look in his eyes like he can see straight through you.  Would you watch a movie simply for ninety minutes of Sam Elliott?  We would.

The Hero premiered at the Sundance Festival to mixed reviews.  Echoing the themes of David Lynch’s The Straight Story mixed with the ambitious effort of Sofia Coppola’s Lost in Translation, The Hero is finally making its way to theaters across the country this summer.  In the latest movie about Hollywood looking at itself, The Hero finds Elliott as Lee Hayden, a has-been actor whose career peaked in the 1970s.  Hearing news of his terminal illness he revisits his career, his relationship with his estranged daughter, played by Jessica Jones’ Krysten Ritter, and befriends a much younger flirt played by That ’70s Show’s Laura Prepon.  Even better, Elliott’s real-life wife, Katherine Ross, who dazzled moviegoers sporadically across the decades in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Stepford Wives, The Graduate, and Donnie Darko, plays Hayden’s ex-wife in the film, a rare look at an equally underrated and brilliant performer we only wish we could see more of.

Sam Elliott has a history of being the best part of every movie he stars in: as Cher’s boyfriend in Mask (1985), as the Mark Twain-inspired narrating Stranger in The Big Lebowski (1988), as Virgil Earp in Tombstone (1993), as General Ross in Hulk (2003), as the perfect fantasy world Texas aeronaut Lee Scoresby in The Golden Compass (2007), and as the Caretaker in Ghost Rider (2007), and countless other movies and TV shows.

Here is Elliott in his latest work, The Hero:

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Butch and Sundance

TCM Big Screen Classics and the Fathom Event series are bringing one of the top ten Westerns of all time back to theaters for a limited engagement.  Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is returning to theaters across the country Sunday, January 17, 2016, and Wednesday, January 20, 2016.  Paul Newman, Robert Redford and Katherine Ross star in one of the most famous stories of the west.  Bank robbers and the best ever buddy movie?  You can’t miss it.

The trio play off each other so naturally you really wish there could have been a sequel.  Great fun, with the most popular music of 1969.  “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ On My Head” playing behind Newman and Ross’s bicycle ride reflects a carefree spirit that must have accompanied the actual risk-averse band of gunslingers.  The film stands strong today and on multiple viewings Newman and Redford only seem to get better.  You may even find you want to book a plane to Bolivia.

The film won Academy Awards for screenplay, cinematography, score, and for “Raindrops”–a double win night for Burt Bacharach.

Butch and Sundance vintage poster

Here is the original trailer for Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid:

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Evan Peters QuickSilver Time in a Bottle X-Men Days of Futue Past

Review by C.J. Bunce

BOULEVARD DRIVE-IN — It’s hard to believe it has only been six years since Jon Favreau surprised the world, taking a typically underwhelming character like Tony Stark, casting Robert Downey, Jr. as Iron Man, and making the best modern superhero movie.  Although fanboy director Favreau made the Christmas classic Elf before Iron Man, who knew he was going to change how we evaluate the modern superhero film?  So it shouldn’t be surprising that a proven genre director like Bryan Singer, with titles under his belt like The Usual Suspects, X-Men, X-Men 2, X-men Origins: Wolverine, Superman Returns, and Valkyrie, has set the new standard in the summer blockbuster sci-fi, fantasy, and superhero sphere with his latest X-title, X-Men: Days of Future Past.  You don’t even need to be an X-Men or Marvel fan to realize what a triumph Singer has achieved.

The movie is gigantic from the opening set-up.  The giant mechanical Sentinels of the comic books take over Earth in the distant future, weeding out once and for all the small bands of survivors, creating a very Terminator-influenced opening.  Now see if you can spot a theme here.  A band of what you might call Tier 3 X-Men, led by Kitty Pryde (played by Oscar nominee Ellen Page), find a way to send something back into the past to save themselves from Sentinel strikes.  Golden Globe and Emmy nominee Patrick Stewart’s Professor X, Oscar nominee Ian McKellen’s Magneto and Oscar nominee Hugh Jackman’s Logan aka Wolverine take Pryde’s method to come up with a time travel plan that results in dual casts trying to save their world, one in 1973, the other in the future.  Storm, played by returning Oscar winner Halle Berry, tries to fend off the Sentinels to allow the time travel trick to work.

Magneto Fassbender

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