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Tag Archive: Lincoln


Review by C.J. Bunce

As history writer Colin Salter remarks in his new book 100 Speeches that Changed the World, “Speeches have always been the greatest form of advocacy.  The speaker’s careful choice of words, phrases, and sentences to persuade his or her audience is as creative an act as the poet’s or playwright’s.”  And the speech has a job to do, a mission to accomplish.  “They must convince the listener of something; perhaps a speaker’s devotion, an apology, a government’s decision, or an accused man’s innocence.”  Speeches have a target audience, and if written and delivered well, they can change the world.  Salter has collected 100 speeches to defend the thesis in his title, that words can change behavior, and that his selections fit the bill.

Any time a writer conquers a work that looks like a list, along with considering and listening to the rationale for the inclusion of the entries, the reader is required to challenge that list.  It’s the challenge and fun of these kinds of books to ask whether these are good choices, bad choices, or whether there are better works that should have been included.  In the case of 100 Speeches that Changed the World, most of the speeches are from the 20th century, so there is a modern sensibility here.  This is a book ideal as a supplement for a high school or 100 level college literature course–most entries are from Americans, but many are from England.  Socrates’ response for being accused of corrupting the youth of Athens is the oldest, from 399 B.C.  Yet only five speeches pre-date the Gregorian calendar (so this isn’t a book for ancient history readers).  William Wallace, Patrick Henry, Robespierre, Frederick Douglass, Chief Joseph, and several U.S. Presidents and authors make up much of the rest, with emphases on the World Wars.  Lincoln, Hitler, Churchill, FDR, MLK, JFK, Mandela, and Obama have multiple entries, with the most artful commentaries included coming from the mouth of Churchill (four).

Stranger references are to responses, not actually speeches, from Elvis Presley and John Lennon.  Some court case opinions and comments are included, but they seem out of place here, fulfilling the usefulness and persuasiveness of works, perhaps, but do not merit inclusion as “speeches.”  Still 100 Speeches that Changed the World is a thought-provoking review of how men and women have used words to make great things happen, and also twist them to bring about their own ill ends.

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It’s a little difficult to get your head around.  Eight years ago when I suggested going to your video rental store to watch the ultimate Fourth of July movie–Jaws–we still had several video rental stores in every town.  It’s very different now with streaming services (have you finished Season 3 of Stranger Things yet on Netflix?) and any Blu-ray you want available overnight for purchase from retailers like Amazon.  To be fair, you can still rent movies, the plastic disc kind, at local Redbox machines, and Family Video still has a good footprint across the nation and a broad video selection (pretty much Blu-rays prevail, so sorry to people still with only VHS and plain ol’ DVDs).  Back in 2011 when I listed some recommended viewing material for Independence Day here at borg, I mentioned some films including my pick for today.

Every audience, every moviegoer, is after something different.  If you’re looking for action try on Captain America: The First Avenger, or even binge the entire Captain America series of films.  The first Independence Day movie from 1996 has your dose of sci-fi, and it’s an easy choice to go to especially if you’re too young to have watched it before.  Even Independence Day–the day, not the movie–means different things to different people.  I would recommend to anyone films like Dave, The American President, The Post, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, All the President’s Men, Sergeant York, Far and Away, The Last of the Mohicans, Lincoln, Glory, and Dances with Wolves–each covers some aspect of what America stands for.  Actually Frank Capra has more in the category, too, including Meet John Doe and State of the Union.  

Four of my favorites are playing on Turner Classic Movies/TCM today.  At 8:30 a.m. Central is John Ford′s She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, followed at 10:30 a.m. Central by Ford’s Fort Apache These are some of the famed director’s finest works, and high points for both Henry Fonda, John Wayne, and Maureen O’Hara, plus the stories tell other tales of the American experience (and both rate high on my all-time best Westerns list here).  A recent anthology film fits the bill for today well–that’s the Coen Brothers’ The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, which we reviewed here at borg last year.  It tells several stories of the pain, struggle, and sacrifice of peoples from throughout the world coming together to build a nation.  But what’s that sure-fire Fourth of July movie that should appeal to everyone?

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If this film doesn’t scream Oscar nominee I don’t know what will.  And no, we’re not talking about the film about Lincoln as a Vampire Hunter.  This afternoon Steven Spielberg released the first trailer for his film Lincoln, a big-screen account of the last days of President Lincoln and the U.S. Civil War.

Check out the supporting cast: Sally Field (The Amazing Spider-man), Tommy Lee Jones (Men in Black, Captain America), David Strathairn (Alphas, Memphis Belle, Sneakers), Hal Holbrook (The Fog, Into the Wild, All the President’s Men), Bruce McGill (Star Trek Voyager, Animal House), Jackie Earle Haley (Watchmen), Joseph Gordon-Levitt (Dark Knight Rises, Looper), Jared Harris (BBC’s Sherlock)… Continue reading