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Tag Archive: Masters of the Universe


Super7 is returning to San Diego Comic-Con in two weeks with more great new products for 2018.  And you can find new releases not only in the main dealer area at SDCC (Booth #4945), but at two events at the Super7 downtown store at 701 8th Avenue (a 10-minute walk from the San Diego Convention Center)–with some items only available at the store.  For the first offsite sale, Hordak’s Lair from Masters of the Universe is the theme of the first event Wednesday, July 18, from 9 p.m. to Midnight and Thursday, July 19, from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.  It will feature the latest Super7 MOTU releases as well as exclusives and debuts created specifically for the event, like an exclusive 5.5-inch Laughing Prince Adam figure.  Limited quantities will be available only at the Super7 store, with another opportunity to order for October delivery being announced at the Super7 website soon.  Hordak’s Lair will also offer an exclusive site-only sale of a new She-Ra & Hordak 3.75-inch ReAction figure 2-pack with new, original card art by Jason Edmiston.  Super7 will also premiere its new blind box assortment of She-Ra Keshi 1.75-inch Figures.

Then the Super7 switches gears for a Universal Monsters “Boodega Corner Monstore” Friday, July 20, from 9 p.m. to Midnight, Saturday, July 21, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Sunday, July 22, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.  That will be the only place to score four Universal Monsters on these new cardbacks:

Other exclusives at the Boodega only include four Universal Monsters 7″ x 21″ felt pennants and enamel pins.  So what’s available at the actual convention?

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Netflix is now carrying a new documentary television series that delves into the creators behind some of our favorite toys from the recent, and not so recent past.  The Toys That Made Us features four episodes in its first season of streaming, each focused on a toy line that should bring in a good cross-section of fandom.  The choices for the first shows include Kenner’s vintage Star Wars action figures and playsets, Hasbro’s G.I. Joe, with an emphasis on the 3 3/4″ line of action figures, Mattel’s Barbie, and the Mattel’s Masters of the Universe No doubt Barbie and G.I. Joe should pull in the older crowd, while the latter half of G.I. Joe and Star Wars will pull in the kids of the 1970s and early 1980s, and Masters of the Universe the kids of the 1980s.

Not a show for kids and not another show about toy collectors, the series devotes plenty of each hour to interviews with designers, marketing, other businessmen discussing the nuts and bolts of negotiating deals, like the lawyer for Kenner discussing the greatest toy deal negotiation ever, and the later not-so-great negotiation because of a loose-lipped CEO.  The Barbie episode features a Barbie expert continually bashing the character as a “hooker” as if she has some sort of love-hate relationship with the doll.  But the politics of toymaking is interesting fodder for the right audience.  Should it be a surprise that toymakers have the same ugly corporate politics, the downsizing, the layoffs, and the takeovers, like every other company?  Prepare yourself for several CEOs and designers as they tiptoe, or not, around decisions and employers they wrestled with in the past as toys and brands came and went.  The creators look back both with nostalgia and anger at the former toy companies that eventually terminated their employment.  So look for an unusual take on these toys and these companies.

The next four episodes will be launched on Netflix later this year, and include Hello Kitty, Transformers, Star Trek, and LEGO.  Sometimes what the show chooses to tell is as interesting as how the show tells it.  The eight toy lines chosen no doubt came from the producer’s own focus groups, like the ideas behind some of the toys they discuss.  If The Toys That Made Us really is a one-time thing, someone else should come along and continue the idea with all the other major brands and influences.

We want to see an episode on Marx toys, including little toy soldiers and the 12-inch action figure series.  We also want to see a history of the broad Mego line of figures, Hot Wheels, Stretch Armstrong, and Big Jim.  How about companies like Fisher Price, Playskool, Playmobil, and Radio Flyer?  A series like this needs to cover more “recent” but still classic toy lines, too, like My Little Pony, Cabbage Patch Kids, Strawberry Shortcake, and figure out a way to capture famous classic toys like Spirograph, Tinker Toys, Play-Doh, Etch-A-Sketch, Erector Sets, Lincoln Logs, and the ultimate multi-license toy, Viewmaster.  How about a tour of the Milton Bradley and Parker Brothers factories of the past?  Who put out more great board games than these companies?  It’s easy to imagine entire episodes on the history of games like Clue/Cluedo and Monopoly.  And how about featuring a current game company that’s been around for decades, like Wizards of the Coast?

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At New York Toy Fair 2017 Super 7–formerly partnered with Funko–proved yet again that no other toy company compares when it comes down to sheer volume of licenses it holds, and the company continues to venture into the obscure and retro as shown in its line of ReAction, classic 3 3/4-inch Kenner-inspired action figures we have covered here at borg.com since day one.  We’ve seen Alien, Arrow, Back to the Future, Big Trouble in Little China, Breaking Bad, The Bride of Frankenstein, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, The Creature from the Black Lagoon, The Crow, The Dark Crystal, Dracula, E.T., the Extra-Terrestrial, Escape from New York, The Fifth Element, Fight Club, Firefly, The Flash, Frankenstein, Friday the 13th, The Golden Girls, The Goonies, Gremlins, Halloween, Hellraiser III, The Invisible Man, Jaws, The Karate Kid, Masters of the Universe, The Mummy, The Nightmare Before Christmas, A Nightmare on Elm Street, The Phantom of the Opera, Predator, Pulp Fiction, The Rocketeer, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Scarface, Scream, Star Trek, Suicide Squad, Taxi Driver, The Terminator, Terminator 2: Judgment Day, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Tomorrowland, Trick or Treat, and The Wolfman.  

What more could you want?

How about Planet of the Apes, Hellboy, Shogun, Robotech, the classic Batman 1966 TV series, Iron Maiden, Heavy Metal, The Toxic Avenger, Street Fighter 2, Nosferatu, Alfred Hitchcock, and more Alien, plus figures from the sequel Aliens, more Masters of the Universe, and more of those ultimate retro action figures that never were: The Worst. (Follow the links to learn more and order available figures from Entertainment Earth).

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With Planet of the Apes you’ll see Cornelius, Zira, Taylor, an Ape Soldier, and General Ursus.  With Robotech, at least six VF series robots, six Shogun figures, Batman, Robin, Batgirl, and several villains from Batman ’66, as well as the classic Batmobile.  Hellboy features Hellboy, Abe Sapien, Liz, and Lobster Johnson.

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Masters of the Universe.  Red Dwarf.  Mortal Kombat.  And we revisit Marvel, Star Wars, and Star Trek.

Let’s start this year’s borg.com Hall of Fame ceremony by talking a little about who is NOT in the Hall of Fame who might come close if borgs were more loosely defined.  We still haven’t included the non-organic: like automatons, androids, or robots.  Think Lt. Commander Data from Star Trek: The Next Generation before he met the queen in Star Trek: First Contact–despite his perfectly life-like appearance.  For the bulk of the series Data was always an android, not a cyborg.  He’s just a highly advanced C-3PO–until First Contact. 

Droids from Star Wars, Gort from The Day the Earth Stood Still, Robot B-9 from Lost in Space or Robby the Robot in Forbidden Planet, the Autobots and Decepticons of Transformers, the police force of THX-1138, Box in Logan’s Run, the perfectly human appearing kid-like star of D.A.R.Y.L., the several automatons of episode after episode of The Twilight Zone, Beta in The Last Starfighter, Tron and Flynn and the other microscopic, human-like bits of data in Tron, Hellboy II’s Golden Army, the future Iowa Highway Patrolman in Star Trek 2009 (we assume he’s just wearing some police safety mask), Rosie the maid in The Jetsons, Hogey the Roguey from Red Dwarf, Marvin the Android in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, X-Men’s Sentinels, Lal and Juliana Tainer from Star Trek: The Next Generation, the title character of CHAPPiE, or Iron Giant, despite their human-like or bipedal nature, none are actual borgs because they lack biological matter, living cells, or the like.

The same applies for the robotic hosts in Westworld–Michael Crichton’s original was clear these were merely automaton robots and we’ve seen nothing from 2016’s HBO series to show that has changed (even the NY Times got it wrong).  Which explains why The Stepford Wives aren’t on the list, or Fembots, either from The Bionic Woman or the Austin Powers series, or the Buffybot in Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

So who’s in?

Here is Round 4, the twenty-eight 2016 borg.com Hall of Fame honorees, in no particular order, some from 2016 and others from the past, bringing the roster count to 134 individuals and groups:

First up is Time, yep… Time itself.  From Alice Through the Looking Glass, a powerful Father Time-esque human/clockwork hybrid who rules over Underland–

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From George Lucas’s original Force-wielding character as envisioned by Mike Mayhew: Kane Starkiller from Marvel Comics’ alternate universe story, The Star Wars:

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The Major, from 2017’s Ghost in the Shell:

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Max Steel got his own movie in 2016:

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Steel hails from the Mattel action figure who received multiple super powers due to an accidental infusion of nanobots:

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Cave Carson from the update of the classic DC Comics comic book series spelunker, the new series Cave Carson has a Cybernetic Eye:

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Although he was a charter member of the borg.com Hall of Fame, Darth Vader returned in Rogue One, providing some new images of the classic borg:

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More of our inductees, after the cut…

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Are you a fan of Mattel’s Masters of the Universe and ThunderCats from the 1980s?  Were they a part of your afternoon cartoon line-up?  Did you pit your action figures of He-Man and Lion-O, in an epic battle against Skeletor and Mumm-Ra on your parents’ living room floor?  If so, a new series from DC Comics and Mattel may be your next favorite comic book.

An outgrowth of the Big Jim action figures and toy line, Masters of the Universe toys first appeared in 1981.  Four years later we met the ThunderCats in a Marvel Comics series and animated television series.  Flash forward thirty years and Mattel’s Rob David and Lloyd Goldfine have written a limited series bringing together the two worlds with interior artwork and covers supplied by Freddie E. Williams II.  The artist had a big year with another big crossover, his Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles series, a huge hit for fans of both franchises and for DC Comics.

Advance publicity for the series gives us a look at what’s to come: In his eternal desire to destroy the mighty ThunderCats, the evil Mumm-Ra quests for a weapon that can rival the legendary Sword of Omens: He-Man’s Sword of Power!  But his dimension-spanning scheme launches a cataclysmic crisis that will, for the first time ever, unite Lion-O, Cheetara, Tygra, Panthro, WilyKit and WilyKat with He-Man, Battlecat, Teela, Man-At-Arms and the rest of the Masters of the Universe.

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This week the six-issue series begins.  We have a preview of the series below for borg.com readers.

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Review by C.J. Bunce

Some call them guilty pleasures–those films that are more bad than good, but have some quality you can’t quite identify that cements them in your own memory.  You might not admit how much you like those films, but you do, and you’d also willingly admit the quality of the film is still bad, bad, bad.  As you watch writer/director Mark Hartley’s new film about two cousins that created one of the most well-known independent B-movie film studios, I will wager you will see at least four movies from the 1980s that you’ll admit only to yourself “hey, I loved that movie.”

Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films chronicles two Israeli cousins, Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus, successful filmmakers in their home country who took America by storm, taking over Cannon Group in 1980 and churning out more movies than any other studio, eventually releasing about a movie a week before it ran out of money.  The documentary highlights one of the studio’s defining, over-the-top and embarrassingly bad movies: Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo.  Cannon helped the careers of names like Jean-Claude Van Damme and Dolph Lundgren and helped propel the second phase of the careers of actors like Chuck Norris, Charles Bronson, and Sylvester Stallone.  The list of surprising names showing up in their films included Star Trek: The Next Generation’s Marina Sirtis and Patrick Stewart, and Sharon Stone, but even once big names like Vincent Price, Christopher Lee, and Peter Cushing could be found in a Cannon movie.

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Delta Force, Missing in Action and Missing in Action 2, Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Lifeforce, Hercules (with Lou Ferrigno), King Solomon’s Mines, Runaway Train, Invaders from Mars, American Ninja, Bloodsport, Cyborg, Death Warrant, Masters of the Universe, Powaqqatsi, and Superman IV, for good or bad, emerged from Golan and Globus’s years at Cannon.

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Super7 Haunted House SDCC 2015

San Francisco-based toy company Super7 announced several exclusives this week that the company will be offering at San Diego Comic Con later this month, including a giant Haunted House to be used with their 3 3/4 inch action figure line with Funko toys.  Super7’s biggest playset so far, the Haunted House is designed to fit any and all 3 3/4 ReAction figures and classic Kenner figures.  Measuring in at a whopping 25” wide and 20” tall, the three-story mansion is packed with trap doors, concealed entrances, hidden rooms and secret passages.

Super7 spent almost an entire year developing this playset to match the vintage cardboard playsets of the 1970s.  Loaded with over 60 individually painted panels and countless custom double-pass die-cuts on both sides of every board, the Haunted House may look simple, but this was the most complex toy Super7 has ever produced.  Available exclusively from Super7, the Haunted House playset will be available for $75 each, limit one per person at SDCC booth #4945 (action figures not included).  Look below for close-up photos.

Universal Monsters ghost figures

Super7 will also be offering two Nightmare Before Christmas action figures, and a four-figure Universal Monster monster playset including a crypt. Super7 will also be offering a Masters of the Universe prototype set, available only at Skeletor’s Lair during SDCC at 701 8th Ave., San Diego, CA 92101.

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He-Man print in limited edition of The Art of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe

Review by C.J. Bunce

Next month Dark Horse Comics releases a must-read for fans of He-Man, She-Ra “Princess of Power,” and the Masters of the Universe world of toys, animated series, magazines, chapter books, posters, comic strips, and comic books.  The Art of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe Limited Edition Hardcover includes more than 300 pages full-color art, a portfolio featuring an exclusive print by Gerald Parel, a foil-embossed cover, and a die-cut two-piece Castle Greyskull slipcase.  A standard edition of the book will also be available.  Many well-known creators worked with these characters since its inception in the early 1980s, including Ralph McQuarrie, Drew Struzan, Dick Giordano, J. Michael Straczynski, George Tuska, Klaus Janson, Boris Vallejo, Tony Moore, Darwyn Cooke, Geoff Johns, and Tommy Lee Edwards.

Designers from every stage of the creation of He-Man, She-Ra, Skeletor, and the large cast of sword and sorcery heroes and villains, offer insight into character development, decision-making, and the impact on 1980s kids.  The best feature is the inclusion of hundred of pieces of full-color art, concept artwork, page layouts, sketches, storyboards, packaging art, prototypes, never before seen and unused imagery, advertising art, original comic art, and final comic book pages, covers, and animation cels.  It features restored art from master illustrator Earl Norem, as well as interviews with Dolph Lundgren, who played He-Man in the 1987 movie, director Gary Goddard, well-known TV producer/comic book writer Paul Dini, and voice actress Erika Scheimer, among many others.  Captions for photos were written by comic book creators Tim Seeley and Steve Seeley.

The Art of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe Limited Edition Hardcover slipcase edition

Particularly of interest to toy collectors are the original notes from the development stage of the toy line at Mattel.  Mattel, which had passed on the ground-breaking Star Wars action figure line, developed He-Man as a direct competitor to that toy line.  Mattel drove the look of the characters–this was first and foremost a toy line, inspired in part by the fantasy art of Frank Frazetta.  But it grew beyond that.  Artists and writers and other creators remark with pride about the focus on the stories that went beyond the toy line.

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