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Tag Archive: Molly Ringwald


Review by C.J. Bunce

Queen Elizabeth I, Prince Harry, Winston Churchill, Ron Howard, Ginger Spice, Agent Scully, Chuck Norris, Vincent Van Gogh.

What do they all have in common?  Plenty.

Truly–this latest look at a segment of the Earthling population should have been part of the Hidden Universe travel guides.  It’s Ginger Pride: A Red-Headed History of the World, called “a rallying call and calling card for gingers,” it’s a mix of facts, history, and humor about redheads in society.  Compiling everything you’d ever need or want to know about redheads, this quick guide seizes the day and tackles the segment of the population born with a red coif.  More redheads are around than you might think.  Actually 140 million redheads worldwide, 18 million in the United States alone, and two percent of the world population is born with red hair, with ten percent of the population of Scotland, Ireland, and Wales.

Writer Tobias Anthony (a redhead) dives into the history and truths of red hair, with whimsical artwork by Melbourne artist Carla McRae (not a redhead).  He has come up with 20 variants of color of redheads, from auburn to aubergine.  If you don’t know any redheads personally, well, Anthony has a solution for that–a spotter’s guide–where you are apt to find redheads “in the wild” and how to spot a fake redhead or “daywalker.”  (Spoiler: He reports Amy Adams is a fake, Isla Fisher is 100% real redhead).  Anthony even argues why fake redheads should be praised for complimenting the ginger community by trying to join in.  According to the author, if they’re carrying around a lot of emotional baggage, they’re probably a redhead.  And he spotlights the most ostracized of the ginger community is “the Traitor”–what he calls that redhead who dyes his hair another color to hide his gingerness.  Red hair dye amounts to $200 million in sales per year in the U.S., more than any other color.  Surprised “bottled” redheads he has identified in his book include Molly Ringwald, Rita Hayworth, and Lucille Ball.  Why go red?  It looks like it’s the attitude and reputation of redheads that celebrities– and everyone else–is trying to imitate by dying their hair red.

Most useful in the book is the section on etiquette for getting along with gingers.  Key takeaway?  Don’t actually call them “ginger”!  Or carrot top, freckles, or anything else–except their name.  In that way the book successfully uses humor to look at its subject, while also carefully illustrating why singling out anyone for how they look is just wrong.  The author notes there are days of the year dedicated to both kicking (don’t kick anyone, it’s an in-joke) and kissing (get their permission first) gingers.  (Err, wait, don’t we mean redheads?).

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movies-cannon-films-logo

Review by C.J. Bunce

Some call them guilty pleasures–those films that are more bad than good, but have some quality you can’t quite identify that cements them in your own memory.  You might not admit how much you like those films, but you do, and you’d also willingly admit the quality of the film is still bad, bad, bad.  As you watch writer/director Mark Hartley’s new film about two cousins that created one of the most well-known independent B-movie film studios, I will wager you will see at least four movies from the 1980s that you’ll admit only to yourself “hey, I loved that movie.”

Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films chronicles two Israeli cousins, Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus, successful filmmakers in their home country who took America by storm, taking over Cannon Group in 1980 and churning out more movies than any other studio, eventually releasing about a movie a week before it ran out of money.  The documentary highlights one of the studio’s defining, over-the-top and embarrassingly bad movies: Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo.  Cannon helped the careers of names like Jean-Claude Van Damme and Dolph Lundgren and helped propel the second phase of the careers of actors like Chuck Norris, Charles Bronson, and Sylvester Stallone.  The list of surprising names showing up in their films included Star Trek: The Next Generation’s Marina Sirtis and Patrick Stewart, and Sharon Stone, but even once big names like Vincent Price, Christopher Lee, and Peter Cushing could be found in a Cannon movie.

electricboogaloo

Delta Force, Missing in Action and Missing in Action 2, Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Lifeforce, Hercules (with Lou Ferrigno), King Solomon’s Mines, Runaway Train, Invaders from Mars, American Ninja, Bloodsport, Cyborg, Death Warrant, Masters of the Universe, Powaqqatsi, and Superman IV, for good or bad, emerged from Golan and Globus’s years at Cannon.

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Jem movie poster

G.I. Joe: Retaliation director Jon M. Chu is transforming another 1980s animated television series into a live action theatrical release.  The series Jem ran three seasons and 65 episodes, between 1985 and 1988.  Jerrica Benton was the secret leader of the glam rock, all-girl band in the original series.  The band’s name, Jem and the Holograms, will soon be the title of the live action film.  The original Jem prompted a successful toy line from Hasbro, one of the companies bringing the series to the big screen.

The magical elements of Jem do not appear to have made it to the new movie.  In the animated series Jerrica projected a holographic image over her own to disguise herself.  Aubrey Peeples (Sharknado), who could almost be a ringer for actress/singer Zooey Deschanel, now stars as Jerrica, who takes on the persona of Jem as her career in music takes off, thanks to a music producer played by Juliette Lewis.  The 1980s brat pack star Molly Ringwald co-stars.

Ryan Hansen Jem and the Holograms

Isn’t that Ryan Hansen, Dick Casablancas from Veronica Mars, at the end of the trailer, getting an autograph from Jem?

Check out this preview for Jem and the Holograms:

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