Advertisements

Tag Archive: Paddy Considine


   

A new political satire film is coming to U.S. theaters next week–The Death of Stalin.  Ahead of its U.S. release, it has already caused controversy in Russia and other former Soviet Union states, and it’s been banned in Russia, Kyrgyzstan, Azerbaijan, and Kazakhstan.  Russian leadership has stated, “The Death of Stalin is aimed at inciting hatred and enmity, violating the dignity of the Russian people, promoting ethnic and social inferiority, which points to the movie’s extremist nature.  We are confident that the movie was made to distort our country’s past so that the thought of the 1950s Soviet Union makes people feel only terror and disgust.”  The Death of Stalin is based on a French graphic novel by writer Fabien Nury with artwork by Thierry Robin and Lorien Aureyre.

Sounds like something worth reading, right?

Nury’s The Death of Stalin is a dark comedy take on befuddled Russian leadership in the 1950s.  Strangled by Joseph Stalin’s paranoia and violent extremism, his lieutenants can barely function enough to call for a doctor when he suffers a heart attack that strikes him following his reading of a letter insulting him.  Who will lead after his death and how many Russians will die as power is re-aligned?  The story plays like a Quentin Tarantino film–think of the bulk of the political machinations in Inglourious Basterds mixed with Seth Rogen’s The Interview, plus the absurdity of Doctor Strangelove set against the historical visuals and serious edge of Valkyrie.  And it’s all a very British comedy.

Sourced with a handful of well-known British comedic actors, the film stars Jason Isaacs (Harry Potter series, Star Trek Discovery), Steve Buscemi (Pulp Fiction, The Big Lebowski), Olga Kurylenko (Oblivion, Quantum of Solace), Andrea Riseborough (Oblivion, Never Let Me Go), Michael Palin (Monty Python & The Holy Grail, A Fish Called Wanda), Paddy Considine (Hot Fuzz, The World’s End), and Jeffrey Tambor.  Armando Iannucci (Veep) directs with cinematography by Zac Nicholson (The King’s Speech, Les Miserables, The Scarlet Pimpernel) and costumes by Suzie Harman (The Bourne Ultimatum).

Check out this preview of the graphic novel The Death of Stalin and a trailer for the film:

Continue reading

Advertisements

Fassbender Macbeth

Henry V is probably the best of William Shakespeare’s dramas adapted for film, garnering for director and lead actor Kenneth Branagh two Oscar nominations.  For the bloodiest of Shakespeare’s plays, Michael Fassbender (Inglourious Basterds, X-Men franchise, Prometheus, Jonah Hex) will take the crown as the title character in this year’s Studiocanal production of Macbeth.  Oscar winner Marion Cotillard (The Dark Knight Rises, Inception) will take on the prized role of Lady Macbeth.

From the first trailer released for the latest Macbeth, we can see plenty that may indicate this film is in the same league as Branagh’s film.  Plenty of artistry in the cinematography and costumes, and indications that some real effort went into the battle scenes.  And isn’t Fassbender a dead ringer for Richard Harris in Camelot?

macbeth movie poster fassbender

Other familiar actors featured in the film include David Thewlis (Timeline, the Harry Potter franchise, RED 2, DragonHeart), Paddy Considine (Hot Fuzz, The Bourne Ultimatum, The World’s End), Elizabeth Debicki (The Man from U.N.C.L.E.), and David Hayman (Shetland, Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit).

Here’s the first trailer for director Justin Kurzel’s Macbeth:

Continue reading

Something looking not quite right in The Worlds End

Whether or not you’re a fan of British humor, like Monty Python or the comedy sitcom staples we get in the U.S. on public television, you will probably get plenty of laughs from the third entry in the Cornetto Trilogy.  Director/writer Edgar Wright, along with star and writer Simon Pegg, actors Nick Frost and Martin Freeman and many other actors from early entries in the comedy trilogy, deliver a singularly funny flick, better than you’d expect from the genre.

In the typical U.S. throwaway comedy movie about drinking and bar-hopping, the movie would be full of gross-outs and stupidity–anything–especially a shock–for a laugh.  Edgar Wright cares enough about his own career and his famous actor pals to keep the script funny without sitting back on base humor for the easy laugh.  And you don’t need to see earlier entries Shaun of the Dead or Hot Fuzz (but why wouldn’t you?).  The trilogy is about the creators, not the subject of the films.

The Worlds End Blu-ray and DVD US

Continue reading

HOT FUZZ Cornetto Time

In your quest for the ultimate scrumptious sci-fi fix, if this doesn’t cure your munchies nothing will.  Cornettos.  They look like the American ice cream cone called the Drumstick but Brits claim they are much better.  Since we can’t get them in the States we’ll just have to take their word for it.  Yum… they sure look good.  Cornettos have been featured in the Edgar Wright comedy films starring Simon Pegg and Nick Frost, hence the moniker the “Cornetto Trilogy” or the “Three Flavors Cornetto Trilogy” (or spelled “Flavours” if you like).  And if you’re hungry for two great comedies and the latest and greatest film starring the awesomely funny one-two punch Pegg/Frost combo, then you have one chance this Thursday night at more than 150 screens across the U.S.

Shaun of the Dead Cornettos

At 5:30 p.m. local time Thursday August 22, 2013, select theaters will show Shaun of the Dead–the greatest zombie spoof movie ever, and maybe just the greatest zombie movie, too.  Pegg plays Shaun, who is drifting through life with a dull job, Liz–his girlfriend ready to walk out, a quirky mom, a stern stepdad, annoying roommate Pete, and only his best pal Ed and his favorite haunt the Winchester to bring focus to his chaotic life.  So when an apocalyptic zombie uprising arrives, he is well prepared to head it off.

Keep Calm and watch Shaun of the Dead

Following Shaun of the Dead is the cop movie spoof Hot Fuzz.  Pegg is back this time as police officer PC Nicholas Angel who is too good at his job to the point of making everyone around him look bad so he is promoted to a small, rural English town called Sandford that has no crime.  There he partners with Frost’s character PC Danny Butterman to investigate a series of murders, including a local shopkeeper played by former James Bond Timothy Dalton in a great, quirky role.

Continue reading