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Tag Archive: Snake Plissken


mash-up kurt russell

If you’re not a Kurt Russell, please avert your eyes and come back later.

A big Kurt Russell project is coming your way this year.  Director John Carpenter’s Big Trouble in Little China and his Escape from New York will see a dream mash-up only the way BOOM! Studios could do it.  Big Trouble in Little China/Escape from New York will become a six-part crossover comic book series in the Fall.

Written by Greg Pak with artwork by Daniel Bayliss, your favorite swaggering truck driver Jack Burton (played by Kurt Russell in 1986’s Big Trouble in Little China) will be teleported to the bleak future of 1997, where he meets the Man with No Name-inspired, eyepatch-wearing Snake Plissken (also played by Kurt Russell, in 1981’s Escape from New York).  Check out the two variant covers for Issue #1:

Big-Trouble-in-Little-China-01-550x835    Big-Trouble-in-Little-China-02

And here is the full poster together:

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EFNY01_coverB   EFNY01_coverD

That’s right.  The character made famous by Kurt Russell in John Carpenter’s Escape from New York and Escape from L.A. is back.  Tomorrow BOOM! Studios is releasing Escape from New York, Issue #1, a continuation of the exploits of the guy with the eye patch that everyone wants dead.

Written by Christopher Sebela (Ghost, Alien vs. Predator: Fire and Stone) with artwork by Diego Barreto (Irredeemable, Robin), Plissken is Public Enemy Number One.  He’s a survivor in a post-apocalyptic ride that finds Plissken in a 1980s-inspired action world parallel to Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome.

Keep an eye out for a slew of extra variant covers for this issue.

EFNY01_coverC   EFNY01_coverA

After the break, check out a preview of Issue #1, courtesy of BOOM! Studios:

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Escape from New York cover D

Back in July, BOOM! Studios announced that Snake Plissken would be back.  One of John Carpenter’s best, the 1981 sci-fi flick Escape from New York went on to have a rather bleh sequel with 1996’s Escape from L.A.  BOOM! is returning to the classic we all love with its continuing story of the action anti-hero with the eye patch in its new Escape from New York series.

Writer Christopher Sebela (Ghost, Alien vs. Predator) and artist Diego Barreto (Planet of the Apes, Irredeemable) along with cover artists Declan Shalvey, Jay Shaw, and Alice X. Shang will be telling the new tales of this loner in a future Earth’s World War III.

Escape from New York cover A Escape from New York cover C

Following on the heels of its first John Carpenter-Kurt Russell team-up monthly ‘zine, BOOM! Studio’s successful Big Trouble in Little China series, Escape from New York should satisfy our desire for more stories from the John Carpenter ‘verse.

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Bazooka Joe 60th Anniversary

Review by C.J. Bunce

Until only a few years ago every gas station across the country and every local supermarket had Bazooka bubble gum on the counter as a point-of-sale purchase item and at last look three cents was a pretty fair price for the flavor packed into that loud pink rectangle of gum.  And until last year each of those pieces of gum was wrapped in a mini-comic wrapper featuring Bazooka Joe.  As nostalgia goes, what single item compares to the smell and flavor of Bazooka gum—that same smell and flavor tied to baseball cards.  Topps, the gum and trading card company, and Abrams Publishing have released a celebration of the gum and its mini-comic art with Bazooka Joe and His Gang 60th Anniversary.

On first look it’s the design that really hits this new collectible book out of the park—the book jacket has the appearance of a piece of Bazooka gum, complete with the see-through wax paper where you can almost peek at the comic on the back side.  The edge of the paper is all bubble gum pink, creating a perfect package for this coffee table look back at 60 years of the small “throwaway” comics that everyone eyed before wadding ‘em up and throwing them into the trash.  How many if these did you go through in your lifetime?  Literally thousands of the mini-comics were created, most by artist Wesley Morse, including so many in inventory that new comics were being wrapped around gum decades after Morse created them, and decades after he passed away.  This explains why kids in the 1970s were exposed to the 1950s style of artwork on the wrappers.

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