Tag Archive: space program


In her 16 years in the business, Eva Green has co-starred in several major genre films and television shows, including Casino Royale, The Golden Compass, Dark Shadows, Penny Dreadful, and a few tales from the mind of Frank Miller: Sin City: A Dame to Kill For and 300: Rise of an Empire.  Her next project finds her in a French production where she stars as an astronaut on a mission preparing for mankind’s trip to Mars.  Centering on the relationship between her character and her daughter, played by Zélie Boulant, the new movie Proxima saw its first U.S. trailer this week.

The film co-stars Matt Dillon, who has been a recognizable face on the big screen since he appeared with Tatum O’Neal and Kristy McNichol in Little Darlings forty years ago, followed by My Bodyguard with Chris Makepeace and Adam Baldwin, the S.E. Hinton adaptations Tex, The Outsiders, and Rumble Fish, with high points like Drugstore Cowboy, To Die For, and In & Out, and the lead role in TV’s Wayward Pines.

The film appears to be on light on the side of science fiction, with perhaps a European space agency as only the background for a personal drama, but a scene in the trailer shows part of an updated take on the process of mission training, something we’ve seen in earlier iterations of real-life space travel films like The Right Stuff, Apollo 13, and First Man.  Directed by Alice Winocour, it has already received numerous international film awards.

Here is the trailer for Proxima:

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Review by C.J. Bunce

Originally published last year in the UK as A Galaxy of Her Own: Amazing Stories of Women in Space, writer Libby Jackson, flight controller and flight director for the European Space Agency, brings her biographies for grade schoolers to U.S. readers re-titled as Galaxy Girls: 50 Amazing Stories of Women in Space.  An introduction to the space programs of the past and present for girls and boys, Galaxy Girls goes beyond being an assemblage of one-page stories of astronauts, looking back to women of many backgrounds and careers who heavily influenced the progress of space exploration, including many outside the field of aeronautics.  Most of the women in the book were not astronauts or “in space” as the title suggests, but it’s fair to say Earth’s space programs would not have been as successful–or continued to survive this long–without them.

Most fascinating is the scope of the book.  Readers will encounter standouts from expected fields including scientists and pilots, but also lawyers, doctors, textile workers and seamstresses, and women in the early roles as “computers” themselves.  The career path that women selected for the book took the most was that of engineer, but Jackson also includes others, like actress Nichelle Nichols, who, in addition to inspiring young women who would become astronauts from her role on Star Trek, assisted NASA in broadening their recruitment efforts in the 1970s and onward.  Wives of astronauts of years past are also spotlighted as influential and key to space exploration, and even the first woman tourist in space is included.

Readers will meet several women famous for their landmark firsts: Jeannette Piccard–first woman in the stratosphere, Jacqueline Cochran–first woman to break the sound barrier, Valentina Tereshkova–first woman in space, Eileen Collins–first woman shuttle pilot and commander, Svetlana Savitskaya–first woman spacewalker, and Peggy Whitson–first woman space station commander (who has gone on to create new records surpassing even male astronaut records in the past year since the book was written).  And they’ll learn about women who died in pursuit of space science: Christa McAuliffe, Judy Resnik, Kalpana Chawla, and Laurel Clark.  Some of the featured women worked behind the scenes to create the earliest space programs, and others featured are today’s pioneers in aeronautics and engineering, planning Earth’s space programs for tomorrow.

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