Tag Archive: Spielberg Always


PF&A 6   PF&A 5

This weekend Disney released some new posters advertising the sequel to its popular animated film Planes, titled Planes: Fire & Rescue.  Taking on an entirely new look, these new posters are pretty stunning.  Inspired by well-known Art Deco posters from the National Park Service and Department of the Interior from the 1930s and 1940s that we discussed previously at borg.com here, we think these are better than any special limited Mondo edition posters we’ve seen.  Click on each image for a detailed view.

PF&A 1   PF&A 4

Planes was the DisneyToons Studios spin-off of the Disney-Pixar Cars franchise.  Planes: Fire & Rescue Art director Toby Wilson was responsible for the revisiting the National Parks classic era imagery, derived from the famous Works Progress Administration project posters that were re-printed and sold at U.S. National Parks in the 1990s.  Well done!

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Numbercruncher

“Dying young, a brilliant Mathematician discovers a way to cheat the terrifying Divine Calculator.  He schemes to be endlessly reincarnated in the life of the woman he loves, no matter how often the violent bailiffs of the Karmic Accountancy cut short each life.”  

Yet the delivery of this quirky story is delivered through the voice of a foul-mouthed British thug in such a way that it… actually works.  Numbercruncher asks questions involving the biggest topics of life and death yet balances humor and despair in a pretty stunning and imaginative way.

Bastard Zane is a thug.  A dead thug.  He speaks in the local accents of the street kids in Attack the Block or Daniel Craig in Layer Cake, and could easily fit into the crime noir world of Road to Perdition.  And he’s experiencing the real afterlife, not one of angels and pearly gates, but of accountants running the grand show—it’s like the worst case scenario for those afraid of tax men and accountants: heaven is run by numbercrunchers.  Writer Si Spurrier quickly gives us his set up in a way that puts this story alongside the afterlife treatments of Steven Spielberg’s Always, Albert Brooks’s Defending Your Life or even the Philip K. Dick-inspired The Adjustment Bureau–and far better than Jerry Zucker’s Ghost.  And then he proceeds to let his characters chase each other down.

Numbercruncher page

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