Tag Archive: Star Trek The Next Generation 365


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Most people would think twice before buying a book that only contained 96 pages.  No matter the subject, it’s a low page count, and unless you’re looking at books for little kids most adults would pass.  You’d be missing a gem of a compilation were you to pass up the photo-packed Star Trek: The Visual Dictionary Published by DK, the publishing house known for over-sized hardcovers full of lavish, detailed photography on a variety of subjects, Star Trek: The Visual Dictionary delivers where recent Star Trek books have come up short.

As we discussed in past reviews here at borg.com, the Star Trek Vault and Star Trek: The Next Generation 365 both suffered from poor quality photographs and images featured in their book design that were simply too small to glean much detail.  Star Trek: The Visual Dictionary delivers exactly what it promises, rare imagery and props from the studio archives, including material from all five live-action TV series and the first ten Star Trek movies.  DK’s high-quality, many over-sized, images provide fans with a unique opportunity to see Star Trek characters, aliens, and technology in a level of detail that hasn’t been achieved in a full-color Star Trek volume since the Michael Westmore and Alan Sims book Star Trek: Aliens & Artifacts released 13 years ago.

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Review by C.J. Bunce

In the brilliant photographic spectacular Earth from Above: 365 Daysfirst published in 2001, readers were introduced to a new book format, the five pound, strangely formatted 6.5 x 9.7 x 2.1 inch door stop/exercise weight/blunt weapon-capable book, which, at nearly 800 pages was packed full of highly quality images of the Earth.  And the key to the “365” in the title was that it followed events around the Earth through photographs by author/photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand, for a full year.  Harry Abrams publishing has since latched onto the concept with gusto and published an endless volume of books in the oblong and thick format, and, inexplicably, they usually don’t cover 365 days of anything.  Why?  Who can tell?  Examples are subject matter surveys that span multiple years of coverage, despite the 365 in the title, such as The Rolling Stones: 365 Days, World War II: 365 Days, The Wild West: 365 Days, Golf Courses of the World: 365 Days, even Wisdom: 365 Thoughts from Indian Masters, Grateful Dead: 365, and how about Punk 365 and Graffiti 365So you have to put aside any thoughts you may have of a “page a day for a year calendar book” and either like–or not–the format of the coffee table book that may just break your coffee table.

In 2010 Paula M. Block and D.C. Fontana brought us Star Trek: The Original Series 365, and this week Abrams released the follow-up edition, Star Trek: The Next Generation 365, this time by Block with Terry J. Erdmann.  Both Block and husband Erdmann have put out some quality Star Trek non-fiction before, including Star Trek Deep Space Nine Companion and The Secrets of Star Trek: Insurrection.  Will diehard Star Trek fans go for this new work?

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