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Tag Archive: The Incredible Adventures of Dog Mendonça and Pizza Boy II: Apocalypse.


pizzaboy iii cover

Review by C.J. Bunce

What comic book series would you like see adapted to film that hasn’t yet been tried?  The big superheroes–and many small ones–have now made their marks, along with the likes of stories from independent or creator-owned origins like From Hell, Watchmen, V for Vendetta, Cowboys and Aliens, Road to Perdition, A History of Violence, Hellboy, RED, R.I.P.D., Kick-Ass, Kingsman: The Secret Service, and even small screen shows like The Walking Dead, iZombie, and now Wynonna Earp.  Ask me what comic book series I would like to see translated to film the most and I won’t flinch:  It’s Portuguese writer/musician Felipe Melo and Argentinian artist/designer Juan Cavia’s The Incredible Adventures of Dog Mendonça and PizzaBoy.  (I’d invest in that film right now).  It’s the most humorous and satisfying series since Frank Cho’s Liberty Meadows.  Rich in pop culture references like you’d find in Buffy the Vampire Slayer or Leverage, fanboys and fangirls of any franchise will find some all-out fun here.  Now the creators are concluding their series with the final act of an epic trilogy, The Incredible Adventures of Dog Mendonça and PizzaBoy III –Requiem, available now from Dark Horse Comics.

Melo and Cavia (and colorist Santiago R. Villa) are the real deal.  Each of their three volumes has a foreword by a legendary film director fan:  John Landis, George A. Romero, and now Tobe Hooper.  Dog Mendonça (pronounced men-dōn’-sah) and PizzaBoy originally appeared in serial form in the pages of Dark Horse Presents.  João Vicente “Dog” Mendonça is an overweight, Portuguese werewolf operating out of a noir era private investigator’s office.  Mendonça has a lanky unpaid pizza delivery boy who becomes a client he calls PizzaBoy.  And he has an assistant–a 6,000 year old demon named Pazuul, who appears as a chain-smoking blonde girl who never speaks out loud.  They’ve saved the world more times than anyone can count, and are pretty blasé about it.

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We reviewed the first volume in the series, The Incredible Adventures of Dog Mendonça and Pizza Boy, here at borg.com back in November 2012.  In the first book the reader becomes a character walking along with the duo as Melo breaks the “third and fourth walls” in a funny and beautifully drawn story.  Mendonça told the reader his own comic book creation story.  In flashback we saw Mendonça’s tumultuous past.  We learned that Mendonça’s father and six sisters were killed during World War II so that bad guys led by a Nazi could capture Mendonça and use his beastly werewolf powers for his owns ends– a tale full of bad circumstances, an epic journey in a small package, and revenge.

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Dog Mendonça and Pizza Boy Volume II

Review by C.J. Bunce

Forget about all those post-apocalyptic stories, only Dog Mendonça and Pizza Boy could tap the Book of Revelations for a zombie story out of the actual Apocalypse.  Juggling the best parts of John Carpenter’s Prince of Darkness, Raiders of the Lost Ark and the humor of Ghostbusters, with high drama, satire, and whimsical blasphemy, Portugal’s creative team of Felipe Melo, Juan Cavia, and Santiago Villa bring the world-saving duo back to the pages of Dark Horse Comics in The Incredible Adventures of Dog Mendonça and Pizza Boy II: Apocalypse.

We reviewed the first volume in the series, The Incredible Adventures of Dog Mendonça and Pizza Boy, here at borg.com back in November 2012.  In the first book the reader becomes a character walking along with the duo as writer Felipe Melo breaks the “third and fourth walls” in a funny and beautifully drawn story.

This time Dog and Pizza Boy are back in Portugal and all hell is breaking loose.  Locusts, horned beasts, the four horsemen, the sign of the last days, it’s all intertwined with the hilarity of these strange friends, a little girl demon (who was kicked out of Hell) named Pazuul, and a stone gargoyle named Edgar Augustus.  Piled high with pop culture references and in-jokes, Melo’s story is as smart as any book on the newsstands, irreverent and wildly funny.

Juan Cavia’s artistry is as good as it gets.  What’s going on away from the action is often the best part of the scene.  On one page, the top panel shows fire and brimstone raining down on the group as they dodge explosions in their Volkswagen Beetle.  On panel two we see a close-up of Dog and Pizzaboy with looks of horror yet Pazuul has an expression of a gleeful little girl as if on an amusement park ride.  I don’t know why it’s so funny, but it is.

Look for a foreword in this edition by zombie master George A. Romero and a “making of” section as well as “The Untold Tales of Dog Mendonça and Pizza Boy.”

The Incredible Adventures of Dog Mendonca and PizzaBoy Volume 2: Apocalypse is available in comic book stores February 26, 2014, or pre-order a copy here at Amazon.com.

Dog and Pizzaboy III

And if you like the first two volumes in the series, you’ll want to catch the final volume, The Incredible Adventures of Dog Mendonça and Pizza Boy III: Requiem in stores in November 2014.