Orphan Black Soundtrack cover

Orphan Black wrapped its best year yet Saturday with the third season finale “History Yet to be Written.”  Tatiana Maslany has secured her place in the acting elite with a solid third run in a role every actor dreams about–a true showcase of her talents.  This season she shared the multi-role acting gig with the Castor clone brothers played by Ari Millen.  Despite sharing screen-time with the Castors, and expanded roles for Mrs. S, Delphine, and the introduction of the vile Dr. Coady, Maslany created some of the best scenes in the entirety of the series this year.  Alison started a drug-and-soap business and ran for office and won (and had that off-the-wall bedroom scene with Donnie).  Cosima brought in Lost Girl star Ksenia Solo as a show regular, and doubled (awkwardly) for Alison in a campaign speech.  Rachel duped everyone after losing her eye.  And we met poor, new, completely baffled Krystal.  But nothing compares to the character arc developed over three seasons for the incredible Helena and her trusty scorpion adviser.

How could TV watchers possibly fall for a character like Helena?  Raised in a convent outside of any family, trained to be a cold-blooded killer, she would kill four of her clone sisters.  This season she befriended Alison’s husband Donnie, massacred a room full of drug dealers who threatened Alison’s kids, reunited with “boyfriend” Jesse, and proved her fighting skills could take the worst of the Castors out of the equation.  In one word, Maslany, as Helena, was brilliant.  Can the BBC keep up the momentum for season four?  While you’re waiting for 2016, you can pick up two albums released by the BBC and Varèse Sarabande Records.

Helena and Sarah

Sestra pals Helena and Sarah.  Insert your favorite Alanis Morissette song here.

The Orphan Black Original Television Score provides all the feel of the show a card-carrying Clone Club member could want.  Composer Trevor Yuile created a distinct sound for the show, mixing the eeriness of Angelo Badalamenti with the evocative repetition of John Carpenter and the mechanical sound of Massive Attack or Daft Punk.  Beginning with the psychedelic Orphan Black theme, which we only wish there was a full, expanded version, the album moves the listener between memorable themes.

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