Tag Archive: Toby Wilson


Review by C.J. Bunce

Sony Pictures Animation, the studio that made Spider-Man: Into the Spider-verse and the LEGO movies brought its latest and greatest animated film to Netflix earlier this month with The Mitchells vs. The Machines–a sci-fi, apocalypse, coming of age story (reviewed here) about a normal but weird family that tries to dodge a planet-wide extermination resulting from the very technologies humans are so addicted to.  Much of the action takes place during a cross-country trip, and it’s that imagery that is underplayed on the big screen, but really comes to life as incredible art in The Art of The Mitchells vs. The Machines, a behind the scenes book of exploration coming to Amazon here and a bookstore near you next week.  Gravity Falls creators Michael Rianda and Jeff Rowe wrote and directed the film, a visually stunning spectacle, with contributions by the Academy Award winning duo of Phil Lord and Christopher Miller (both known for the LEGO movies and Into the Spider-verse).  Author Ramin Zahed interviews those creators and more and shares hundreds of concept art images for this next look into the development of cutting edge animation.

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PF&A 6   PF&A 5

This weekend Disney released some new posters advertising the sequel to its popular animated film Planes, titled Planes: Fire & Rescue.  Taking on an entirely new look, these new posters are pretty stunning.  Inspired by well-known Art Deco posters from the National Park Service and Department of the Interior from the 1930s and 1940s that we discussed previously at borg.com here, we think these are better than any special limited Mondo edition posters we’ve seen.  Click on each image for a detailed view.

PF&A 1   PF&A 4

Planes was the DisneyToons Studios spin-off of the Disney-Pixar Cars franchise.  Planes: Fire & Rescue Art director Toby Wilson was responsible for the revisiting the National Parks classic era imagery, derived from the famous Works Progress Administration project posters that were re-printed and sold at U.S. National Parks in the 1990s.  Well done!

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