Advertisements

Tag Archive: Tom Cruise movies


Review by C.J. Bunce

Once again Tom Cruise proves he can’t make a bad action movie.  This Friday his latest, American Made, opens in theaters nationwide.  It is absolutely a Tom Cruise movie for anyone that loves Tom Cruise movies, and everyone else will find a 1980s flashback blast waiting for them.  Cruise has had starring or recognizable roles in 42 movies.  As with star actors like John Wayne and Arnold Schwarzenegger, many expect to see Cruise play Cruise in every new film, but that’s not quite what happens.  Like many actors you can bundle their performances into categories, although it’s easy to find some overlap.  There are Cruise’s cocky maverick hotshots in Jack Reacher, Collateral, Mission: Impossible, Days of Thunder, Rain Man, Cocktail, The Color of Money, and The Outsiders.  That’s a bit different Cruise than the renegades of Top Gun, Oblivion, Valkyrie, Minority Report, Born on the Fourth of July, and The Last Samurai But that’s not the Cruise you’ll find in American Made.  This is Cruise as flawed, cavalier everyman–and a bit of a dope–the kind of roles you could see Gary Cooper or Kevin Costner cast in.  Early buzz suggests this new role is Cruise as cocky maverick hotshot, but that’s only on the surface because he’s playing a pilot.  In American Made you’ll find the more casual but layered Cruise of War of the Worlds, Far and Away, Edge of Tomorrow, A Few Good Men, The Firm, and Jerry Maguire.  This is also the more likeable, more relatable Cruise persona.

Cruise’s character Barry Seal was a real person who fell into some crazy, impossibly outlandish situations as a pilot in the 1970s and 1980s.  This isn’t a true biography–the real events in Seal’s life are far different than as portrayed in the first half of the film, but the second half tracks much closer.  The Barry Seal of the film begins as a well-trained pilot that gets bored with the mundane.  He starts small, smuggling cigars from Cuba into the states while a TWA pilot.  Then a CIA agent named Schafer catches him and offers him a deal: Seal’s evasive techniques are perfect to take spy photos in Central America.  For Seal it beats boredom, and it’s a breeze for him, despite the frequent heavy gunfire.  Seal gets in deep but never really seems to understand how deep, because underneath what would appear to be your typical hotshot pilot is that bit of a dope.  He is so clueless he can’t fathom that his wife, played by Sarah Wright Olsen (Parks and Recreation, Enchanted, 7th Heaven), won’t respond affirmatively that she trusts him when he gives her a smile and asks “do you trust me?”  Twice.  He’s actually taken aback, despite the impossible situation he drags his wife into (like Jerry Maguire trying to convince his new girlfriend that all isn’t as bad as it seems).  And his new pal list includes Manuel Noriega.

CIA agent Schafer (an amalgam of agents the real-life Seal had worked with) is played by Domhnall Gleeson (Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Ex Machina, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows).  Gleeson is a ringer for Timothy Busfield in Field of Dreams or Sneakers and has great chemistry with Cruise–and he’s surprisingly strong directing the much older Cruise’s actions in scene after scene despite his youth.  Together Schafer and Seal build-up some CIA successes, but Seal has a growing family and needs some extra money on the side–and Schafer isn’t providing more money–so the CIA success is coupled with Seal’s casual assistance in the rise of the Medellin Cartel as he begins smuggling cocaine.  The DEA learns about it and Seal bounces back and forth, playing for both sides, ultimately smuggling weapons for the White House and Ollie North in what became the Iran-Contra scandal.  And then the FBI gets involved.  And all the while Seal literally can’t figure out what to do with all his proceeds from his smuggling, burying some piles of cash in the yard, his wife stuffing shoe boxes full of money in closets, after buying up much of the small town they arrive at in Arkansas.

Continue reading

Advertisements

rocket

Our annual “All the Movies You’ll Want to See…” series has been one of the most viewed of all of our entries at borg.com each year.  So this year we again scoured Hollywood and its publicity machine for as many genre films coming out in 2017 that have been disclosed.  The result is a whopping 58 movies, many you’ll probably want to see in the theater or catch on video (and some you may want to skip).  We bet you’ll find a bunch below you’ve never heard of.  Bookmark this now for your 2017 calendar!

Most coming out in the second half of 2017 don’t even have posters released yet.  We’ve included descriptions and key cast so you can start planning accordingly.

What do we think will be the biggest hits of the year?  How about Star Wars: Episode VIII or Wonder Woman?   Luc Besson’s Valerian and the City of 1,000 Planets?  Ghost in the Shell?  Or Beauty and the Beast? 

justice

You’ve heard endlessly about Logan and Justice League, but 2017 will also see numerous other sequels, like Alien: Covenant, Blade Runner 2049, Thor: Ragnarok, and sequels for Underworld, Resident Evil, Planet of the Apes, Pirates of the Caribbean, XXX, John Wick, King Kong, The Fast and the Furious, Cars, The Kingsman, Transformers, Despicable Me.   And The Six Billion Dollar Man is finally on its way.  Look for plenty of Dwayne Johnson, Tom Cruise, Vin Diesel, Ben Affleck, Samuel L. Jackson, Zoe Saldana, Hugh Jackman, John Goodman, Michael Peña, Ryan Reynolds, Sofia Boutella, and Elle Fanning in theaters this year.

So wait no further, here are your genre films for 2017:

Continue reading

Jack Reacher sequel

If you missed 2012’s Tom Cruise action flick Jack Reacher, you missed Cruise in one of his best performances.  That’s saying a lot considering Cruise has more successful movies than any other actor.  Check out our review of Jack Reacher here at borg,com.  We compared Reacher to Harry Callahan, Frank Bullitt, and Daniel Craig’s James Bond.  We might add any number of Chuck Norris roles, or, as seen in this new trailer for this year’s sequel, Jack Reacher 2: Never Go Back, John Rambo.

Reacher is a no-nonsense guy, and his signature move is beating someone with someone else’s body parts, whether it’s their arm or head.  But they usually deserve it.  And we always cheer him on.

This time around Cruise is joined by Cobie Smulders (The Avengers, How I Met Your Mother), Robert Knepper (Heroes, Star Trek: The Next Generation), and Aldis Hodge (Leverage). 

Jack Reacher Cobie Smulders

Check out this first trailer for Jack Reacher 2: Never Go Back:

Continue reading

Mission impossible scene

This weekend in theaters across the country you could see some exciting previews of coming movies, including Star Wars: The Force Awakens and Everest (as well as some that look like duds, which shall go unnamed).  One of the best was this behind the scenes look at Mission: Impossible–Rogue Nation, which hits theaters this weekend.

The marketing folks for this fifth entry in the modern Mission: Impossible reboot series have been parading this poster of Tom Cruise hanging from the side of an airplane for months.  For any other movie we’d yawn and note it as another action sequence in what has really been a solid action series.  Each film has Cruise doing some physical maneuvers.  Who can forget Cruise in the 1996 original film, hanging by two cables as he hacks a CIA computer after lowering himself from a ventilation duct into a secure facility room from after bypassing a laser grid.

mission impossible 5 poster

But this movie has something different.

Check out this preview and behind the scenes look at Cruise’s airplane stunt.  (Trust us, it looks pretty incredible on the big screen):

Continue reading

Cruise Mission Impossible 5 Rogue Nation b

How does he do it?  How does Tom Cruise keep churning out exciting movies, over and over again?  We can count 27 of his movies that we’d watch all over again, out of a total body of work of 37 movies.  Taps, The Outsiders, Top Gun, Rain Man, Far and Away, A Few Good Men, The Firm, Jerry Maguire, Minority Report, The Last Samurai, Collateral, War of the Worlds, Valkyrie, Jack Reacher, Oblivion, Edge of Tomorrow–any actor would love to have just a few of these in their portfolio, and Cruise was the lead in all but two.  (We hid several Tom Cruise movies in a review of Jack Reacher a year ago here at borg.com–can you find them all?).  Then you have Cruise’s own version of James Bond–only there he is Ethan Hunt and the series is Mission:  Impossible.

The fifth entry in the Mission:  Impossible franchise is coming your way soon.  Each of its predecessors had something new to offer, although none better than Brian De Palma’s 1996 original, derived from the classic TV series.  Mission:  Impossible co-starred Jon Voight, Ving Rhames–a staple for the entirety of the series, and Kristin Scott Thomas.  Every action director wants to try his hand at making a Mission:  Impossible movie.  Director John Woo helmed Mission: Impossible II in 2000, co-starring Brendon Gleeson and Dougray Scott.  In 2006, J.J. Abrams and writing duo Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci gave it a try with Mission:  Impossible III.  This best of the sequels so far co-starred Philip Seymour Hoffman and Michelle Monaghan, Billy Crudup, Lawrence Fishburne, and brought comedic actor Simon Pegg into the mix.  Then in 2011 Mission:  Impossible–Ghost Protocol, directed by Brad Bird of The Incredibles fame, added Jeremy Renner to the team.

Mission Impossible 5 V Rogue Nation poster

After the break, check out the new preview released this weekend for Mission:  Impossible–Rogue Nation:

Continue reading

Oblivion

Tom Cruise as mega-hit actor pretty much can do no wrong.  Where Kevin Costner excels at boyish buffoonery, Tom Cruise plays cocky like no other.  Where Arnold Schwarzenegger plays the ultimate action hero, Tom Cruise’s trademark parts are fiercely determined and angry.  Like Arnold, if you can put aside and ignore his personal antics, his films always entertain.  Whether it’s Cruise in a small role like way back in Taps and The Outsiders, or the usual leading man role, as with A Few Good Men, Rain Man, Top Gun, War of the Worlds, the Mission: Impossible films, Minority Report, Jerry Maguire, The Last Samurai, The Color of Money, Far and Away, The Firm, or Valkyrie, his films just don’t disappoint.

Oblivion B

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: