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Tag Archive: Jason Masters


BondVargrHC-Cov

James Bond’s story did not end with the last Ian Fleming novel.  His exploits have been recounted in a classic comic strip series (including a recent collected edition we reviewed here at borg.com), the movies have often strayed beyond the original Fleming novels and short stories, and licensed novels continue to be published each year.  We even had one limited comic book series, Mike Grell’s Permission to Die.  Dynamite Comics has its own monthly series, and the first six issues are being reprinted in a hardcover edition hitting your local comic book store tomorrow.  We have a preview of the new collected edition below for borg.com readers, plus a preview of the next story arc, EIDOLON.

In the first storyline of the monthly series, titled VARGR, Bond returns to London after finishing a mission in Helsinki.  Taking over the work of fallen agent 008, he embarks on a new mission in Berlin where he encounters a web of secrets. The series is written by Warren Ellis (Transmetropolitan, The Authority) with artist Jason Masters (Batman Incorporated, Guardians of the Galaxy).  The new hardcover edition includes bonus materials, including covers and concept art.

Special cover issue 1 3 vargr

Masters artwork along with colors by Guy Major combine to create an authentic early 1960s vibe for the setting.  The story will appeal to fans of both the Fleming novels and fans of the current, grittier Bond of the Daniel Craig movies.  It also manages to keep some of the wink-wink humor of Roger Moore’s Bond.  And better yet, we have new borg in the characters Dharma Reach and Slaven Kurjak.

So check out this preview of James Bond: VARGR:

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Detective Comics 19 cover

By C.J. Bunce

Sometimes you want to just sit down and view a single TV episode where you walk away at the end of the hour having been energized with a complete end to end story.  I remember countless episodes of the X-Files with the monster of the week and these stand out to me from the episodes that followed the long-term plot of Fox Mulder’s lost sister or uncovering the mysterious smoking man’s real story.  I have the same thoughts about standalone issues of comic books.  Most series today have multi-issue story arcs and they are usually relevant and continue the intrinsic and historic serialized nature of monthly comic series dating back to the origin of comic books.  But when I was a little kid I’d flip through the short supply of comics at my local Kwik Shop and sometimes you’d be lucky and get an issue with a single beginning to end story and sometimes you’d start reading and have no idea what is going on.  I still get excited about a book when I get a great end-to-end story.  Detective Comics #19–the 900th issue of Detective Comics is one of those reads.

When the old DC Universe ended in August 2011, Detective Comics was at issue #881.  Detective Comics was set to become the second DC Comics series to reach Issue #900 after Action Comics.  Then the New 52 renumbered everything.  No matter.  DC Comics knows when it has something to celebrate, so to mark the occasion it is publishing a good ol’ 80-page giant issue.  As part of its across-the-line gatefold cover series, it cleverly manages to include the number 900 as part of its cover, as well as integrate the number into its storyline in a meaningful way.

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