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Tag Archive: Jeff Parker


The ultimate shark sighting?  A make-ready skit when Jason Momoa finally gets to host Saturday Night Live?

We have seen some great team-ups that also served as great mash-ups.  One of the best came last year when DC Comics took a side trip with Warner Bros.’ Looney Tunes characters, especially in the Batman/Elmer Fudd crime-noir, one-shot story “Pway for Me,” by Tom King, Lee Weeks, and Lovern Kindzierski.  It was our pick for last year’s best team-up/mash-up.  This year DC Comics is back, but this time they paired off again with characters from Hanna-Barbera.  Last year for DC Meets Hanna-Barbera, Volume 1, that meant pairing Jonny Quest and Adam Strange, Space Ghost and Green Lantern, Flintstones and Booster Gold, and Suicide Squad and Banana Splits.  In comic book stores and coming soon in a compilation edition, DC Meets Hanna-Barbera, Volume 2 features even more great team-up/mash-ups:  Who wins when you pair The Flash and Speed Buggy?  How serious can cartoon characters get when you’ve teamed Black Lightning and Hong Kong Phooey?  Or “Super Sons” Robin and Superboy taking on Dynomutt?  But the winner is clear… How could you possibly lose with a team-up of Aquaman and Jabberjaw?

With the right amount of seriousness (mainly from Aquaman) and the right amount of nostalgic humor (mainly from fun-loving land shark Jabberjaw), Dan Abnett strikes throwback gold with a story full of seaside quips and Jaws references, pulling ideas even from the classic favorite Superfriends show.  The result is one of the best Aquaman stories we’ve read.  And Abnett completely tapped into the pulse of the classic Jabberjaw cartoon, tying in his band of friends The Neptunes.  Artists Paul Pelletier, Andrew Hennessy, and Rain Beredo created a unique, incredible look, something out of Syfy’s Haven town and Luc Besson’s future world in Valerian and Laureline.  THIS is the ongoing series that needs to continue, although, understandably the pairing is a big stretch even for comic books and animated series, bridging time and space to get these two worlds together.  But it works.  From the setting, a seaside tourist town called Amnesty Bay (playing on the Jaws town of Amity), to the return of the world’s best drumming shark, to the sound of fingers on a chalkboard, to those Rodney Dangerfield meets Curly Howard catch-phrases, to the final entanglement with shark hunters, this one has it all.

DC has already featured Hanna-Barbera together in ongoing comic book series from the favorite characters of 1970s Saturday morning cartoons in the series Future Quest, Scooby Apocalypse, The Flintstones, Wacky Raceland, Dastardly and Muttley, The Ruff and Reddy Show, The Jetsons, and Exit, Stage Left!: the Snagglepuss Chronicles.  A great writer should be able to find unlimited potential for Jabberjaw and his friends.  Check out these preview pages from the publisher for the story “A Bigger Beat”–

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Flash04-Cov-Laming   Victory01-Cov-Fox

Dynamite Comics has several new books on the shelves today, and we have previews for two that you may want to check out, one new series, following the Jack Kirby superhero Captain Victory and one from an ongoing monthly, Flash Gordon.

It’s always interesting to see how new writers and artists will reinterpret Alex Raymond’s 1930s sci-fi/fantasy hero Flash Gordon.  Flash Gordon, now in Issue #4, features a new story by Jeff Parker with art by Evan “Doc” Shaner and colors by Jordie Bellaire.  There’s almost something Jonny Quest or Mark Trail about Shaner’s style here.

Kirby’s Captain Victory and the Galactic Rangers gets a new monthly today.  Originally from a concept from the 1980s published by Pacific Comics, writer Joe Casey and artists Nathan Fox, Jim Rugg, and Ulises Farinas bring Victory back for a new audience.  The art and design for Issue #1 is very, very cool.

Flash04-Cov-AnnivCastro

After the break, check out previews of Flash Gordon, Issue #4,  and Captain Victory and the Galactic Rangers, Issue #1, courtesy of Dynamite Comics.

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Flash01-Cov-Laming

If you’re missing the Flash Gordon of the 1980 movie then a new monthly comic book series beginning today may be for you.  Following the original story elements from Alex Raymond’s original stories first laid down in 1930s comic book strips discussed previously at borg.com here and here, but updating elements to the present day, Dynamite Comics is rebooting Flash Gordon for a new audience.

Issue #1 of the new series finds Flash Gordon and sci-journalist Dale Arden a year ago, with Arden covering the last space shuttle’s decommissioning, and Flash bungee jumping.  One year later at they are about to encounter the planet Mongo, and the dreaded Emperor Ming, for the first time.  That is, after a slight detour to the planet Arboria, and an encounter with Prince Barin.

Like the 1980 movie, this Flash Gordon series has a confident, cocky and a bit foolhardy Flash, and a no-nonsense, sharp, and attractive Dale.  It’s just brought forward a bit with the starting point–34 years updated from the film.  Jeff Parker is the series writer, with art by Evan Shaner.

After the break, we have a preview of Flash Gordon, Issue #1, courtesy of Dynamite Comics:

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Kings Watch 01 -Cover-Laming    Kings Watch 01 -Cov-Perez

Classic fantasy characters are thriving in the pages of monthly comic book series published by Dynamite Comics.  Look for Flash Gordon, The Phantom and Mandrake the Magician, brought together for the first time this month in Kings Watch. 

You’ve likely heard of Flash Gordon and The Phantom but you might not be familiar with Mandrake the Magician.  Mandrake is a character created by Lee Falk in 1934–before he created The Phantom.  A magician using hypnosis, psychic and telekinetic powers, he was the feature character in a King Features Syndicate comic strip written by Falk for 65 years–from 1934 to 1999.  Some historians refer to Mandrake as the very first comic superhero.

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Kings Watch adds yet another classic team-up monthly to the enormous catalog of classic characters maintained by Dynamite today, including The Lone Ranger, Green Hornet, The Shadow, Bionic Man and Bionic Woman, Zorro, Red Sonja, Buck Rogers, and Ms. Fury.

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