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Tag Archive: John Layman


It’s hard to believe we first Kelly, Sabrina, and Jill forty-two years ago.  And don’t forget Bosley and Charlie.  Charlie’s Angels, replaying all these years later on cable channels, remains great nostalgic fun for fans of the early all-women team-up series.  Jaclyn Smith’s Kelly, Kate Jackson’s Sabrina (long before she was Mrs. King), and the first of the circulating #3 position: Farrah Fawcett-Majors’s Jill Munroe.  Although the series ran from 1976-1981, Jill was a member of the team in the first season only.  Dynamite Comics is returning to that first season in its new series Charlie’s Angels.  Written by John Layman with art by Joe Eisma, get ready for a 1970s throwback in the vein of Dynamite’s The Six Million Dollar Man Season Six and Wonder Woman ’77/The Bionic Woman series.

Here is the marketing release information from Dynamite:

The Angels are back, baby!  The original Angels, Jill, Kelly and Sabrina!  Travel back to the swingin’ 70s, and revisit the butt-kicking, crime-fighting, mold-breaking lady detectives who took 70s TV by storm, ready to do the same to comics 40 years later!  Break out your bell-bottoms, feather your hair, and jump back to an era of peanut-farmer presidents, gargantuan gas-guzzlers and foxy female detectives… for a globe-trotting adventure that’s simply too big and epic for the 70s-era boob tube.  Written by elderly Eisner winner and solicitation-writing former-superstar John Layman, and with art by his scrappy but lovable youngster pal, Joe Eisma.  This is one comic you DON’T DARE TO MISS!!!!

Look for ten covers for Issue #1 of the series, including the main cover with logos and an incentive cover without logos (above) by David Finch and Jimmy Reyes, two covers by Joe Eisma, three character design variants, two pencil-only variants, and a blank sketch cover:

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Today Dynamite Entertainment is releasing a classic run of Xena: Warrior Princess stories first published in 2006 and 2007.  The collection includes great stories of Xena, Gabrielle, Joxer, Autolycus, and Callisto, written by John Layman and Keith Champagne, with interior artwork by Fabiano Neves and Noah Salonga, and cover art by Stiepan Sejik.

Xena: Warrior Princess Omnibus Vol. 1 is a trade paperback edition collecting in full color the monthly series Xena, Volume 1, Issues #1-4, and Dark Xena #1-4, and the one-shot Xena Annual #1.

The Omnibus includes the complete “Contest of Pantheons” and “Dark Xena” storylines written by Layman, plus the “Strange Visitor” story from Xena Annual #1.

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Xena and her friends find themselves in a feud with the Gods themselves, Gabrielle makes a misstep throwing Xena into her own “mirror universe” persona, and they all come face to face with a visitor from out of this world.  Check out a preview of Xena: Warrior Princess Omnibus Vol. 1 after the break:

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Detective Comics 19 cover

By C.J. Bunce

Sometimes you want to just sit down and view a single TV episode where you walk away at the end of the hour having been energized with a complete end to end story.  I remember countless episodes of the X-Files with the monster of the week and these stand out to me from the episodes that followed the long-term plot of Fox Mulder’s lost sister or uncovering the mysterious smoking man’s real story.  I have the same thoughts about standalone issues of comic books.  Most series today have multi-issue story arcs and they are usually relevant and continue the intrinsic and historic serialized nature of monthly comic series dating back to the origin of comic books.  But when I was a little kid I’d flip through the short supply of comics at my local Kwik Shop and sometimes you’d be lucky and get an issue with a single beginning to end story and sometimes you’d start reading and have no idea what is going on.  I still get excited about a book when I get a great end-to-end story.  Detective Comics #19–the 900th issue of Detective Comics is one of those reads.

When the old DC Universe ended in August 2011, Detective Comics was at issue #881.  Detective Comics was set to become the second DC Comics series to reach Issue #900 after Action Comics.  Then the New 52 renumbered everything.  No matter.  DC Comics knows when it has something to celebrate, so to mark the occasion it is publishing a good ol’ 80-page giant issue.  As part of its across-the-line gatefold cover series, it cleverly manages to include the number 900 as part of its cover, as well as integrate the number into its storyline in a meaningful way.

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