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Tag Archive: Tim Waggoner


 

With the 40th anniversary of Ridley Scott’s Alien in full swing, yesterday for Alien Day 2019 we only scratched the surface of what is coming your way this year by way of non-fiction and fiction offerings about the film and franchise.  But before we get to previews, you’re not going to want to miss Alien returning to the theaters October 13, 15, and 16, 2019.  Fathom Events is again partnering with TCM Big Screen Classics for this big event.

 

The biggest news from the publishing front arrives this fall.  Titan Books is releasing Alien: 40 Years/40 Artists, an artistic tribute to the sci-fi horror masterpiece Alien.  Forty artists, filmmakers, and fans have been invited to contribute a piece of original art to commemorate the 40th anniversary.  Pieces range from alternative posters to gothic interpretations of key scenes.  Sketches, process pieces, and interview text accompany each new and unique nightmare.  In addition to cover artist Dane Hallett—an Alien: Covenant concept artist—the contributors include Blade Runner 2049 director Denis Villeneuve, Sam Hudecki, Tanya Lapointe, Star Wars concept artist and creature designer Terryl Whitlatch, Kong: Skull Island director Jordan Vogt-Roberts, and Jon Wilcox.

Tim Waggoner, one of the best tie-in writers of fiction is back with Alien: Prototype, where we find corporate spy Tamar Prather stealing a Xenomorph egg from Weyland-Yutani, taking it to a lab facility run by Venture, a Weyland-Yutani competitor.  Former Colonial Marine Zula Hendricks—now allied with the underground resistance—infiltrates Venture’s security team.  When a human test subject is impregnated, the result is a Xenomorph that, unless it’s stopped, will kill every human being on the planet.  You can pre-order Alien: Prototype now here at Amazon.

Three more new Alien books are in the works for this year.  Below we have your first look at Alien: The Blueprints.

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Review by C.J. Bunce

What shines through in Kingsman: The Golden Circle, Tim Waggoner‘s novelization of this summer’s successful sequel to Kingsman: The Secret Service is how lead spy Eggsy is so different from James Bond.  Even Ian Fleming’s later Bond novels don’t include the fast-paced, extended action sequences found in modern spy stories like this latest foray into the genre.  Both spies are dressed to the nines, they have a tech whiz supporting their efforts, and a smarter, wiser mentor guiding them.  But that’s where they veer apart.  Taking a graphic novel based world, then translating it to film, and back to prose requires certain elements be retained and others fleshed out.  Waggoner’s latest novel strikes the right balance–it is loyal to the source material, an interesting deep-dive into each of the story’s characters, and a fun read.  It’s also a good opportunity to compare the world of the Kingsman to other spy novels.

Eggsy, as seen on the screen, requires the viewer to get into his head to try to understand his motivations if he is to be something other than a plugged-in action hero.  His quick reactions are part of what defines the character and the Kingsmen–these are not simply the best agents but agents that are confident and cocky and their moves fully back up the confidence.  In the novel we see that Eggsy is as nice a guy as he is a brilliantly tuned, results-driven machine.  When he must get into bed with a target to plant a tracking device, he first hides in the bathroom to call his girlfriend.  Is he unwilling to commit to her because he is a James Bond womanizer?  No, he just hasn’t thought that far, in part because he’s a dumb street kid thrust into the spy world.

As we read earlier this year in Donald E. Westlake’s superb Forever and a Death, modern spy stories–like every new Bond movie–require more intrigue, more double crosses, more politics, and maybe something new.  Kingsman: The Golden Circle provides all of this.  The “new” is found in different places–in your face and over-the-top violence that draws from the Coen brothers and Tarentino, a lead who is more street urchin than London elite, a villain that out-crazies every Bond villain you can think of, and the real twist–a crime that seems to draw more from the zombie genre than the spy genre.

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Fringe Burning Man    carvedinflesh

Can’t get enough of your favorite paranormal sci-fi TV series?  Four TV tie-in novels released this year may help.

This summer Friday the 13th, A Nightmare on Elm Street and The Twilight Zone tie-in author Christa Faust released two novels delving into the backstory of the popular sci-fi TV series Fringe.  First up is Fringe: The Zodiac Paradox, where Faust tells the story of how Walter Bishop and William Bell perform an experiment in 1971 with a drug that opens a gateway to a parallel universe that allows the real-life Zodiac killer into our universe.  That drug ends up being cortexiphan–the drug that TV viewers will know well from the series.   Fringe: The Zodiac Paradox is for fans of John Noble’s Walter Bishop character who want to look deeper into his early life before the changes that made him the oddity he became in the TV series, and provides some details behind the impetus for the Fringe Division.

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