Tag Archive: Netflix


Review by C.J. Bunce

When I previewed Cowboy Bebop: Making the Netflix Series last month I’d hoped writers Jeff Bond and Gene Kozicki (a visual effects artist on the series) would dig deep into the unique style of the very futuristic series.  I am happy to say I was not only not disappointed but dazzled by the level of work completed for what could have been the next major science fiction franchise.  What does the future look like?  Going back to Syd Mead’s future-defining work on films like Blade Runner, you must count as the next futurism visionaries production designers Grant Major and Gary Mackay.  Cowboy Bebop: Making the Netflix Series delivers photographs of props and sets that viewers didn’t get to see in the series, providing another level of behind-the-scenes production design not ordinarily seen in this kind of “making of” book.

Continue reading

Review by C.J. Bunce

With hits Tron: Legacy, Oblivion, The Dig, Only the Brave, and Top Gun: Maverick, director Joseph Kosinski seems to be batting a thousand, and his best work may be his new science fiction movie, Spiderhead.  Now streaming on Netflix, it should remind you of the days before sci-fi blockbusters, when science fiction tales by great futurists became the next amazing story you’d see on the big screen.  It also has the genre world’s best actors, with Chris Hemsworth as a pharma genius slash mad scientist running a penitentiary in the vein of A Clockwork Orange, and Miles Teller as his chief inmate, test subject and guinea pig.  Fresh off of The Offer, and co-starring in Top Gun: Maverick, Teller’s career trajectory seems to only be going up.  Compared to the usual direct-to-Netflix fare, especially compared to its record of sci-fi genre films (basically that’s ARQ, iBOY, The Cloverfield Paradox, Extinction, I Am Mother, The Midnight Sky, and IO), Spiderhead is in a different league entirely.  Think THX-1138, Minority Report, Ex Machina, and Orbiter 9Spiderhead is a movie you’ll wish you were able to catch in the movie theater.

Continue reading

After three DreamWorks animated movies featuring Jack Black as the voice of Po the Kung Fu Panda, Black is back, joined by Magnum PI’s Amy Hill and James Hong in a new summer series on Netflix.  Kung Fu Panda: The Dragon Knight finds Po teaming up with an English knight on a quest to rescue magical weapons, to take over the world like Thanos in Marvel’s Avengers movies.  Can Po join forces with the knight, battle a pair of nefarious weasels, save China, and restore his honor?

Take a look at this trailer for the new Kung Fu Panda series, The Dragon Knight:

Continue reading

Stranger Things and Unsolved Mysteries’ Shawn Levy is one of the creators behind The Future Of, a new documentary series coming to Netflix next week.  More “What If?” than “When and How We Get There,” expect the series to feature interviews with visionaries in several disciplines examining everything from communicating better with dogs to be able to live to 200 years old.

Take a look at the ponderings coming your way in this trailer for The Future Of

Continue reading

Review by C.J. Bunce

Back in 2006 artist-writer Chris Grine published his first of a two-volume Eisner-nominated comic called Chickenhare, featuring a unique hero in a strange new anthropomorphic world, mixing adventure and dark comedy.  This weekend his hero makes it to Netflix in his own animated movie, Chickenhare and the Hamster of Darkness The creator himself has acknowledged in the past the scripts in development for the movie were different than his source material.  The artwork looks nothing like Grine’s characters.  Fans of Grine will find little in common with the new movie, but it’s relatively harmless for really little kids, or older kids who have already seen far better treatments in the talking animal genre, notably Zootopia and Chicken Run–actually all the Aardman Animation shows–and major studio efforts like Ferdinand.

Continue reading

Genre favorite Jenna Coleman is back, this time not as the friendly companion in Doctor Who, but as Johanna Constantine in The Sandman, a new series coming to Netflix this summer.  Based on Neil Gaiman’s series of graphic novels from DC Comics, it’s a dark fantasy tale of another world, a place called the Dreaming, the realm of The Sandman, Master of Dreams, played by Tom Sturridge (Far from the Madding Crowd).  “When Dream is unexpectedly captured and held prisoner for a century, his absence sets off a series of events that will change both the dreaming and waking worlds forever.”

The trailer reveals a British production that has the look and vibe of the Twilight and Harry Potter movie series, and it features a long list of familiar genre faces, including Potter’s David Thewlis, plus Alien3 and Bleak House’s Charles Dance, The Hobbit and V for Vendetta’s Stephen Fry, Star Wars: The Force Awakens’ Gwendoline Christie, Logan and The Predator’s Boyd Holbrook, and Veronica Mars’ Kirby Howell-Baptiste.

Here’s the new trailer for Netflix’s The Sandman:

Continue reading

More than two years since filming and it was well worth the wait.  Stranger Things at last fulfilled its mash-up pop culture promise in its fourth season.  Hidden inside a mix of a B-movie style homage to low-budget horror and Steven Spielberg movies of the E.T. and Goonies vintage, the story finally came full circle in nine big hours over seven episodes.  What do you get when you take 1980s pop culture, a haunted house, a superman lab, more Upside Down, more D&D, not-rabid mynocks, a monster to rival Freddy Kruger, and a huge cast of characters you’ve grown to love (and watch grow up)? The best season of one of the streaming era’s best series.

So let’s dig into Season 4.

Continue reading

Review by C.J. Bunce

A British-led counter-intelligence operation calculated to deceive Nazi Germany during World War II that involved Allied coordination among the likes of Winston Churchill, General Dwight D. Eisenhower, and British intelligence officer Ian Spelling sounds like the stuff of a suspense-thriller, right?  That’s not quite what you get in this weekend’s direct-to Netflix war movie Operation Mincemeat.  As genre movies go, count this spy movie as purely historical fiction, primarily a mix of the mundane steps of pulling off even the most unlikely–but true–adventures in international trickery with some romance thrown in for the legion of Colin Firth swooners.  Detailing the plot to throw the Axis off the scent of Britain’s invasion and liberation of Sicily using a dead body with faked documents dropped off the coast of Spain, the movie lands in the same league as all the other 21st efforts to re-conjure World War II–its bland, sentimental account doesn’t match the drama of contemporary Hollywood of the 1940s.  But if you like watching your favorite British genre actors chewing up the screen, it’s worth the time.

Continue reading

Just because Netflix canceled after only one season 2021’s best sci-fi TV series, best western TV series, best space fantasy series, best retro fix, with the best TV soundtrack, best costumes, best actors and guest stars, and best borg on TV, doesn’t mean we can’t keep reliving the fantastic live-action reboot/homage series Cowboy Bebop One more way we’re going to do that is with Cowboy Bebop: Making the Netflix Series, coming next month from Titan Books.  It’s the official companion book to the Netflix TV series featuring concept art, sketches, behind-the-scenes photography and interviews with the cast and production crew.  Check out a preview below, courtesy of the publisher.

Continue reading

Review by C.J. Bunce

The Oregon Trail.  Not many games can claim to be the first computer game of so many people.  And yet that’s exactly what the game was.  In grade school!  An early roleplay game where players took the driver’s seat–of a Conestoga wagon–trying to survive the trail West without dying of dysentery.  We’ve come along way since the game premiered in 1971.  And so have movies about humans intersecting with computers, with benchmarks like Tron, The Matrix, and Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle.  (Who else is excited to see Dragon’s Lair, the movie?  The animated movie is due out this year from Don Bluth and Ryan Reynolds).  In Netflix’s latest gamer related movie Choose or Die (formerly titled CURS>R), reality is cursed as an old PC game pulls players into a Saw-like gore-filled horror reality.  Unfortunately this movie lacks the fun of Final Destination or Happy Death Day, or any subtlety, and instead arrives as a slashery, forgettable time waster.  Its multiple scenes of self-inflicted violence are unnecessary and over-the-top, making this a “free” Netflix movie you shouldn’t inflict upon yourself.

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: