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Tag Archive: Peanuts


 

“Serve the public trust, protect the innocent, uphold the law.”

From Metropolis to Rocky IV, and The Worst to Universal Monsters, Robotech, Shogun, Slayer, Street Fighter II, Lucha, and more, one of the most eagerly awaited has been figures for RoboCop Although we’ve seen RoboCop as action figures by the likes of toy companies like NECA and other companies over the past 30 years, the new line previewed at New York Toy Fair 2019 from Super7 also pulls in that throwback toy design fans of Super7’s ReAction action figure line flock toward.  Super7 has now released its final figure and packaging designs for RoboCop, and they look great (except that sculpt for the toxic slug guy looks a lot like Super7’s sculpt for John Matuszak’s character Sloth from The Goonies).

But of any action figure previewed at New York Toy Fair in February and released this year, is there any single figure with more potential for collectors than Super 7’s Jackie Robinson?  It has that trading card quality, with its cardboard backing and its vintage photograph design, plus it’s as American as apple pie as a toy/collectible, crossing over in the collector market between ReAction retro figure fans and baseball fans.  And the entire Classic All-Stars line is superb.  The other figures in the first group available measure up with Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, Willie Mays, Ted Williams, Carl Yastrzemski, Yogi Berra, Roy Campanella, Juan Marichal, Carlton Fisk, and Orlando Cepeda–plus the first of the mascots in the toy series, from the Philadelphia Phillies.  You can pre-order any or all now at Entertainment Earth (links embedded in names above).  And if Super7 doesn’t get to your favorite player, these will be easy to paint and modify for your team–just like you may have painted the classic electric football player pieces of years ago.

The other line of figures with potential is the classic Peanuts characters in the ReAction format, featuring two Charlie Browns, Linus, Lucy, Sally, Schroeder, and, of course, Snoopy.  These are based on Charles Schulz′s original strips, and have a look that bridges the Funko Pop! and the classic Kenner retro figure sizing and packaging.

Here are images of these three lines and first phases of designs released:

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great-pumpkin

On Halloween night the Great Pumpkin rises out of his pumpkin patch and flies through the air with his bag of toys for all the children. 

Sally was Lucy.  Kathy was Sally.  Chris was Charlie.  Peter was Linus.  And Bill was Snoopy.

For fifty years Charles M. Schulz’s Linus Van Pelt has been trying to convince us all to believe in The Great Pumpkin in The Peanuts holiday special It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown!  Following on the success of the Peanuts Christmas special, Schulz was tapped to pick a holiday and subject and went with Halloween over Thanksgiving and the Great Pumpkin was destined for the small screen in October 1966.

It’s the one time Charlie Brown wasn’t the only ostracized kid in the neighborhood (although he’s the one who gets rocks every year and we never learn why).  Remember when all the little kids dressed up in the same costumes?  Here the costumes of choice were ghosts and witches.  And a World War I flying ace–Snoopy took his first flight on the screen in his Sopwith Camel in The Great Pumpkin.  

Chris Shea voiced Linus, Kathy Steinberg voiced Sally, Peter Robbins was Charlie Brown, and Lucy was voiced by Sally Dryer.  And Bill Melendez was the voice of Snoopy.

rocks

Who knew Sally was such a little lawyer?  You don’t remember that?  Watch it again and see.  And who saves the day?  Big sister Lucy.

If you missed the annual television viewing of It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown!, don’t fret, you can watch the entire show here:

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Peanuts movie clipIt’s something that fans of Charlie Brown and Snoopy have been waiting for, for several reasons.  The Peanuts Movie hit theaters late last year, but it was lost in the movie season among the spectacle that was Star Wars released just weeks later.  Yet if you saw it in the theater, you realize this movie was a keeper.  The Peanuts Movie is what all family movies strive for:  classic characters, good-natured humor, something to enjoy for every moviegoer.  The very young will love Snoopy and understand the relationship of the Peanuts kids that we older folks have known and loved for years, in newspaper funnies, in paperback editions, and the many Peanuts specials.  The Peanuts Movie does something else–it provides the best version of Charlie Brown and friends we’ve seen since the original 1965 favorite A Charlie Brown Christmas.

The Peanuts Movie gets it right from the beginning, in its pedigree.  It’s written by Craig Schulz, Charles M. Schulz’s son and a writer on the Community comedy series, and Charles’ grandson, Bryan.  So, unlike the onslaught of lackluster adaptations that have plagued the Dr. Seuss properties after his death, the same heart and soul of Charles’ creation is as powerful as ever.  The writers have turned to the source material for many interactions in the film, like Lucy’s converted lemonade stand/psychiatry office and the famous wall where Charlie and Linus ponder the worlds’ problems, and yet they have updated the story in subtle and important ways that are both loyal to the original and still give loyalists a satisfying pay-off.  And don’t worry, the updating ends with the inclusion of standardized tests–you won’t find any cell phones, smart phones or texting issues for the kids in this movie.

The story centers around Charlie Brown’s attraction to the little red-haired girl who moves in across the street and the lengths he will go to to try to impress her.  This love affair was the core of many original Peanuts comic strips, based on Charles Schulz’s real-life attraction from afar with a red-haired girl.  Snoopy’s parallel exploits in this movie mirror this love affair, as he pursues his own love story on paper, revealed to us as a story of a dog trying to win over air pilot Fifi in his World War I Sopwith Camel fighter plane on a mission in France, also taking on the famous Red Baron.

Peanuts blu-ray

The Peanuts Movie hails from Blue Sky Studios, who brought us the Ice Age franchise.  Even without a 3D television the depth of field here is spectacular, and with the 3D effect director Steve Martino does not shell out standard 3D gimmicks, but lets the characters simply float off the comic strip and into their own full-color, beautiful “real” world.  The backgrounds look like the homes and backyards of any American town cul de sac.  And if you look close enough you’ll see Snoopy finally has fur.

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Garfield_V5_coverA   Peanuts24_coverA

With all the focus on teen and adult readers, you might not know that several popular comic book and comic strip characters are still going strong, and available each week for kids of all ages in your local comic book store.  With the annual re-airing of the classic A Charlie Brown Christmas, why not see what the Peanuts gang is up to today?  BOOM! Studios’ KaBOOM! line has several series catering to the demographic that may not be ready for Revival and Rachel Rising.

This week KaBOOM! is releasing new issues of Garfield, Adventure Time, Steven Universe, and yes, Peanuts.  And for a slightly older set of readers, BOOM! Studios’ BOOM!Box is releasing the next issue of the 2014 breakout hit series Lumberjanes. 

After the break, check out previews for all these titles, courtesy of BOOM! Studios.  All these issues hit comic book stores tomorrow.

Lumberjanes_009_coverA   AT_BananaGuard06_coverA

First up is that lasagna-loving cat Garfield in the trade paperback edition of Garfield, Volume 5.  Whether you’ve read the prior books or not, it’s a cinch to get caught up on Garfield, Jon, and Odie.

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Peanuts movie 2015 Christmas

We first started talking about the new Peanuts movie here at borg.com back in March with the release of the first teaser trailer.  With all the throwaway animation for kids out there these days why not give us a trailer showcasing our old pals an entire year prior to its release?  And lighting up poor Woodstock aside, why not give us a Christmas scene to ponder over?

Which raises the question:  Will the Blue Sky Studios/20th Century Fox update to Charles Schulz’s classic short films and theatrical releases, filmed in Real D 3D and Digital 3D, give us any remakes of classic scenes from past Peanuts films?  Like the Christmas pageant or the Great Pumpkin watch?

3D peanuts movie

After the break, check out the new trailer for Peanuts, featuring Snoopy as a World War I flying ace and his own doggy version of the Sopwith Camel flying over Paris, a scene we have seen many times before:

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Charlie Brown and Snoopy in 3D

What better way to bring in Spring than news of a new Peanuts movie.  Don’t you hope they get this right?

It’s Charles Schulz’s Peanuts characters in 3D, called simply Peanuts.  The franchise that gave us each of the best holiday specials of all time–A Charlie Brown Christmas (1965), It’s the Great Pumpkin (1966), Charlie Brown, A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving (1973), and Be My Valentine, Charlie Brown (1975)–is back, more than 30 years after four prior big-screen efforts that didn’t quite live up to the TV shows: A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1969), Snoopy Come Home (1972), Race for Your Life, Charlie Brown (1977), and Bon Voyage, Charlie Brown (1980). 

And the first teaser trailer is here.  The voice of Chuck seems right and the overall look is pretty good, despite being so different from the classic four-color comic strip feel of the TV specials from the 1960s to 1970s.  But the key ingredient–if they can deliver what they need to deliver– will be the “heart”.  Can a new team of creators get it right?  Please?

Check it out for yourself:

Charlie Brown, Snoopy, Woodstock, Linus, Lucy, Sally, Peppermint Patty, Marcie, Franklin, Schroeder, Pig Pen.  We’re hoping they all are back again.  And maybe, just maybe, Lucy won’t pull the football away this time.

Look for Peanuts in theaters after a long wait–November 6, 2015.

C.J. Bunce
Editor
borg.com

Another Sunday is here, and Easter at that.  (Happy Easter!)  When you think of laugh-out-loud Sunday funnies from years past you may think of The Far Side, Peanuts, or Calvin and Hobbes.  If you were lucky enough you may have read Frank Cho’s original Liberty Meadows strips.  If you weren’t so lucky, or if you just want to read them again (and you will), then we have good news:  Brandy the animal psychiatrist, Frank the veterinarian, Brandy’s roommate Jen, Evil Brandy from a mirror universe, Frank’s own alias Monkey Boy the chimp, Ralph the ex-circus bear, Frank the ex-frat house mascot pig, Leslie the hypochondriac frog, Truman the bowtie-wearing duck, Oscar the dachshund… all are returning soon to a bookstore near you.

Frank Cho announced on his website that he is releasing a two-volume set of books beginning this summer through Image Comics, reprinting all five years of the original Liberty Meadows Sunday newspaper strips. 

A preliminary cover draft by Frank Cho for the new Sunday strip collection.

First, in June, Liberty Meadows Sunday Collection Book 1 will collect year 1, 2 and 3 of the multi-award winning Liberty Meadows Sunday strips.  Frank says that half of these Sunday comic strips will be new to most readers since they were never reprinted after their initial newspaper publication.

Then by year end he will release Liberty Meadows Sunday Collection Book 2, collecting year 4 and year 5 of the Liberty Meadows Sunday strips.  Both volumes will include new material, too.

A variety of Frank Cho comic strips, including ones the syndicates censored, can be found at Frank's website, http://www.apesandbabes.com.

Not only is Frank Cho’s art from early in his career every bit as superb as his current work, his strips were as funny as any humor you’ve ever read.  You will laugh out loud, and if you drink or eat while you read, just be careful, as his humor is abrupt, and comes out of nowhere, and things may involuntary shoot from your nose.  Gross, I know, but I also know this from past experience.  You’ve been warned.  And you must share these strips with others or they may be annoyed, asking you “what are you laughing about?”

At Amazon.com Liberty Meadows Sunday Collection Book 1 appears that it will have a $24.99 release price available in a nice 160-page hardcover edition, however, pre-orders are available now at a significantly reduced price.

Expect some great art by Frank Cho in his new 2013 calendar, with pinups like this drawing the artist created last summer.

Along with several other projects expected this year, like the eagerly awaited Guns & Dinos first previewed here last year at Comic-Con, if you will be attending the San Jose Big Wow Comic Art Fest in May, Frank will be selling a limited supply of a new 2013 Liberty Meadows Pinup Calendar.

But while you are waiting for these new collections, Frank Cho’s original daily comic strips are available in previously released editions, each as hysterically funny as the other:

Liberty Meadows: Book One, Eden (v. 1)

Liberty Meadows: Book Two, Creature Comforts (v. 2)

Liberty Meadows Volume 3: Summer Of Love (New Printing) (v. 3)

Liberty Meadows Volume 4: Cold, Cold Heart (v. 4)

Liberty Meadows: Cover Girl  (reprints all the Liberty Meadows series covers)

And for some even earlier Frank Cho humor, check out his this edition:

University Squared: The Angry Years

 C.J. Bunce

Editor

borg.com