Tag Archive: Titan Books


Review by C.J. Bunce

In the new mystery-horror mash-up, Sherlock Holmes & Count Dracula: The Classified Dossier, Volume 1, writer Christian Klaver jumps right in, serving up Arthur Conan Doyle’s detective and Bram Stoker’s Count not in a face-off, but as a team-up.  As more rights to Doyle’s works enter the public domain, publishers continue to release dozens of new Holmes books each year, each supplying more files for the seemingly endless drawer of his own “expanded universe” cases (come 2023 anyone will be free to write a Holmes story about anything).  This story, another told via the perspective of the reliable confidante Dr. John Watson, is made more fun, because “the more genres, the merrier.”
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Review by C.J. Bunce

The new Saurian travel simulator tie-in companion book Saurian: A Field Guide to Hell Creek is a combination of several great things.  It’s a non-fiction trip to a sort-of Jurassic Park.  It’s time travel–the kind Ray Bradbury wrote about in The Sound of Thunder, where you are transported back to the last years of Earth’s dinosaurs, specifically those found at the Hell Creek formation in South Dakota.  And it’s a true naturalist’s field guide, imagining that you are onsite, observing an ancient ecosystem firsthand.  Since we can’t actually do that, it relies on the next best thing: the results of research from published science from the current leading paleontologists.  If you have ever loved exploring the possibilities of the past posed by dinosaurs, this book is for you.

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Review by C.J. Bunce

I reviewed the movie on its opening weekend in October here at borg.  The movie is a true triumph for fans of director John Carpenter.  Of the ten (yep, ten) prior sequels to the 1978 original that set off an entire genre of movies, Halloween Kills is the most faithful to the original story.  On the screen it was great fun seeing Jamie Lee Curtis reprise her starring role as 1970s survivor Laurie Strode, along with  actors like Charles Cyphers back as the sheriff, Nancy Stevens as the doctor’s assistant, and Kyle Richards as the grown-up little girl.  In Halloween Kills: The Official Movie Novelization, author Tim Waggoner digs into this great story, amplifying the characterization, and making everything that flashed quickly past the movie audience have deeper implications.  He digs into the timeline of events in 1978 as the modern-day return is revealed moment by moment on that single day in 2018 that is spread over this final trilogy of movies.  You’ll be hard pressed to read a better horror tale or movie novelization this year.

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Escape from New York book Walsh

Review by C.J. Bunce

Forty years after the release of the sci-fi classic Escape from New York, we finally have a thorough, modern account of the making of the movie.  In celebration of the 40th anniversary of John Carpenter’s one-of-a-kind story of Kurt Russell’s future criminal Snake Plissken and his attempt to rescue the President from a downed plane over a locked-down New York City, Escape from New York: The Official Story of the Film pulls from the studio archives a trove of behind the scenes photographs to showcase the creation of the movie.  First previewed here at borg back in June, this must-have hardcover book for John Carpenter fans is at last available now here at Amazon.  

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Our borg Best of 2021 list continues today with the Best Books of 2021.  If you missed them, check out our reviews of the Kick-Ass Heroines of 2021 here, the Best Movies of 2021 here, and the Best in TV 2021 here.  And we wrap-up the year with our additions to the borg Hall of Fame tomorrow.  We reviewed more than 100 books that we recommended to our readers this year, and some even made it onto our favorites shelf.  We don’t publish reviews of books that we read and don’t recommend, so this shortlist reflects only this year’s cream of the crop.  So let’s get going!  

   

Best Sci-Fi, Best Tie-In Novel – Moments Asunder by Dayton Ward (Gallery Books).  An engaging read and fun-filled start to a new trilogy, full of great throwbacks to all the Star Trek series, with several surprise characters and incorporated events, and a great update to Wesley Crusher.  Runner-up: Star Trek: Picard–Rogue Elements (Gallery Books), by John Jackson Miller, provided a great story for a newer character, pulling into the mix the future of some familiar characters including the classic villain Kivas Fajo.    

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Back in 1978 there wasn’t a kid that didn’t love the Star Wars Holiday Special, a surprise holiday event that featured the stars of Star Wars on our television sets instead of the movie screen.  It’s there we got close-ups of aliens from the Tatooine cantina at Mos Eisley, we saw Boba Fett in action, and we got to meet Chewbacca’s family as they readied to celebrate Life Day.  It was Lucasfilm’s way of getting fans a Christmas special.  For this Christmas Lucasfilm is looking back to Life Day with the new Star Wars: The Life Day Cookbook: Official Holiday Recipes from a Galaxy Far, Far Away.

I’ve reviewed several franchise tie-in cookbooks and every one of them is really an excuse to have fun in the kitchen and try something new.  By my count this is the ninth Star Wars cookbook, and although I might be partial to The Wookiee Cookbook and its Boba Fett-uccini, or a Han Sandwich, every Star Wars fan will find something new and fun to try in The Life Day Cookbook It’s available just in time for our Earth holidays, and you can order it in the U.S. here and the UK here.  Check out a preview below.

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Review by Elizabeth C. Bunce

An “inverted mystery” is a story that follows a criminal through the planning and commission of a crime–usually murder–from initial conception through the culprit’s ultimate downfall and apprehension (think Law & Order: Criminal Intent).  The focus is on the criminal’s mindset and how his dark scheme unravels.  Tim Major’s The New Adventure of Sherlock Holmes novel The Back-to-Front Murder is a twist on this subgenre… sort of.  Beginning with the classic Sherlockian setup—a client with a curious conundrum—Major’s novel unravels the puzzling murder of a London widower whom it seems no one would have any reason to want dead, least of all Holmes’s new client.  The trouble is, the client did plan the murder, down to the very last detail.

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Review by C.J. Bunce

If you’re a fan of Charles Vess or Neil Gaiman–or both–chances are you’re familiar with their award-winning series and four-part illustrated book, Stardust Twenty-two years later Vess has compiled dozens of in-process sketches, paintings, and preliminary creations and along with images of Gaiman’s original notations fans will find them all in the new book, The Art of Neil Gaiman and Charles Vess’s Stardust: An Informal History, available now here at Amazon.  It’s not every day fans of fantasy artwork get a chance to look inside the creative process of one of the genre’s favorites.  Take a look inside, in our preview below.

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Review by C.J. Bunce

I’m just going to say it.  This may be the greatest pop culture celebration book ever.  It couldn’t be more keyed-in on its source material and fan base.  Ugh.  Gah.  Zhuuh.  You’ll make those sounds and more going through the recipes in Alien: The Official Cookbook, the latest Alien franchise tie-in book and a food prep guide for anyone planning the ultimate Halloween party.  “Gross!”  You can just hear those kids who are fans of gross-out movies as they try to pick what course to make first.  It’s disturbing and a masterpiece at the same time.  Normally I wouldn’t review a cookbook without preparing some of the meals, so I can present a read on the design and content as well as the desirability of the food.  This is an exception, first: to get it out to you before Halloween weekend, and second: because if you’re like me then making these selections for a party will be more for the visual surprise than the eating (I may double back later for a review of the meals, too).

Eggs, chestbursters, and xenomorphs.  Oh, my!  The dishes are all presented in a way Alien designer H.R. Giger would have loved.  Alien is known for its dinner scene, cut short by… intervening events of a horrific nature.  (Insert a screaming Veronica Cartwright as Lambert here).  Thanks to cookbook writer Chris-Rachel Oseland, you, too, can experience something similar.

Alien: The Official Cookbook is available now here at Amazon (you still have time to get it before Halloween!).  Take a look at a preview of some of the recipes below, courtesy of Titan Books.

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Wheres Assassin x

Assassin’s Creed ties together the best of fantasy, time travel, and high adventure.  Assassin’s Creed is the perfect mix of fantasy and fiction, of adventure, sci-fi, and history.  We’ve reviewed several tie-ins to the games here at borg, from Assassin’s Creed: Bloodstone to Assassin’s Creed: The Ankh of IsisAssassin’s Creed: Origins, and the comprehensive Assassin’s Creed: The Essential Guide.  The latest tie-in is for kids, for fans of Highlights magazine, and Where’s Waldo?  It’s Titan Books’ Assassin’s Creed: Where’s the Assassin?, a colorful, over-sized, storybook-format, hardcover book, crammed full with 40 pages of character-filled scenes in international locations from the past.  Your challenge?  To find all the key figures wandering the streets, famous people from history and key characters from the franchise–across eras and continents–ducking into alleyways and hiding in the shadows–or in plain sight.  Assassin’s Creed: Where’s the Assassin? is available now here at Amazon.

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