Tag Archive: IDW Publishing


It was the biggest comic book limited series of 2021, and it featured a rare and certain end to a beloved set of comic book heroes.  At a minimum Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Last Ronin is a love letter to the cinematic action that permeated everything in the 1980s, as well as an homage to the kind of graphic storytelling Frank Miller shepherded into the minds of teens and twenty-somethings back then.  Kevin Eastman returned with co-creator Peter Laird and Tom Waltz and a league of artists to wrap up nearly four decades of sci-fi fantasy antics and drama.  And now like Miller’s Batman: The Dark Knight Returns it’s getting its own hardcover edition.  It’s available in comic shops for the first time today.

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The next Dungeons & Dragons comic book story from IDW Publishing delves into the Gothic monster horror of the RPG series’ Ravenloft, as Dr. Victor Mordenheim’s daughter, discovers a new candidate for what may be a bigger league of Frankenstein-inspired creations.   Dungeons & Dragons: Ravenloft–Orphan of Agony Isle is the latest D&D tie-in comic book series, and its first issue is available in comic book shops now.

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Review by C.J. Bunce

Tokyo 1996–an alien invasion threatens Earth.  Godzilla emerges to seemingly defend against the invaders, who call themselves the Xiliens, but the humans target Godzilla and he is seized by the aliens.  A test pilot, Captain Daitan Matushita and a cyborg scientist named Hoshi–both working for a mad scientist named Doctor Hu, develop a new aircraft to battle the alien threat.  But what about Godzilla?  In a mash-up of Independence Day and Thor: Ragnarok, Godzilla faces King Ghidorah not on Earth, but on a planet where kaiju monsters are battling to the death for the humanoid alien race.  It all happens in the giant 56-page, one-shot comic in IDW Publishing’s third entry of its Godzilla Rivals series, Godzilla Rivals: Vs. King Ghidorah, landing in comic shops today.  It’s an ambitious but thoroughly successfully and entertaining story from writer-artist Adam Gorham. Take a look inside below in a preview from the publisher:

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This week IDW Publishing revealed a new slate of original projects coming this July.  It’s not quite the New Universe or the New 52.  It doesn’t even have a clever new name, simply the “Originals.”  It’s more like TKO Studios rolling out its first line of comic book series, only IDW Publishing has many years of projects in its portfolio.  All-in expect nine new series–a few are short-term, limited series, while others are intended to be ongoing monthly series.  You’ll also recognize at least a few of the creators in this new division of stories for IDW.

So what lies ahead?

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Yes, they’re back.  Get ready for the third installment of the Baldur’s Gate video game with adventures featuring some of Dungeons & Dragon’s most beloved characters: ranger Minsc, and his miniature-giant space hamster Boo.  After decades spent in magical stasis, Minsc and Boo awaken in a Baldur’s Gate that is very different from the one they knew, but there will always be evil in need of smiting!  It’s all in the new IDW Publishing one-shot issue, Dungeons & Dragons: The Best of Minsc & Boo, including Boo off on his own adventure.

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Forty years ago this month, a surprise World War II era character arrived that would become a sci-fi cult favorite, an homage to the 1930s to 1950s Saturday serial adventures, writer/artist Dave Stevens’ The Rocketeer.  A four-issue limited series begins this month for the character’s 40th anniversary–The Rocketeer: The Great Race Cliff Secord is a stunt pilot in 1938 who finds a jetpack that allows him to fly.  This new story, by writer/artist Stephen Mooney, recounts some of the character’s backstory and finds him hunting Nazis rumored to be hiding in California.  The best part?  The actual queen of pin-ups Bettie Page is Cliff’s girlfriend–a concept creator Dave Stevens originally wanted as part of his story.

Cliff of the new story is that wide-eyed young optimist, a bit of a George Bailey in his desire to help the war effort while not an actual soldier.  The artwork has all the war era styles and early 20th century brand of steampunk.  The story should be well-received by Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow fans.  As part of the 40th anniversary, you can also pre-order the giant hardcover 40th anniversary edition of Dave Stevens’ Eisner Award-winning, The Rocketeer–Artist’s Edition now here at Amazon, coming later this month from IDW Publishing.

Here’s a preview of the first issue of The Rocketeer: The Great Race:

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Star Trek: Discovery–Adventures in the 32nd Century is a new comic book series from IDW Publishing spotlighting the characters of Star Trek Discovery.  As seems quite appropriate the first issue begins with a first-person perspective of Grudge, Book’s large fluffy cat.  What is life like as a cat aboard the Discovery?  Frequent Star Trek writer Mike Johnson offers a perfectly crafted introduction to this very opinionated star of the series with artist Angel Hernandez bringing her to life on each page.

Take a look inside at a preview of the first issue of Star Trek: Discovery–Adventures in the 32nd Century below.

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IDW Publishing is marketing it as a “send-up” of the animated series, so the tone may not be exactly what you remember.  Although you may have watched them airing daily after school, the animated character versions of GI Joe and the team’s nemesis COBRA is back this week in the first issue of GI Joe: A Real American Hero–Saturday Morning Adventures.  Written by Erik Burnham, the first issue feels more like Superfriends, but artist Dan Schoening and colorist Luis Antonio Delgado have captured the look of the cartoons.  Check out a look inside the first issue below, courtesy of IDW.

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The modern G.I. Joes you know well meet a member of the classic G.I. Joe Adventure Team and the original Joe–General Joe Colton–in IDW Publishing’s G.I. Joe–Snakes Eyes: Deadgame, first previewed here at borg last year in single issue form, and it’s now coming your way in a collected trade edition Tuesday.  And although it has all the story elements Snake Eyes fans will be familiar with, this story is all about Rob Liefeld’s penciled artwork and a string of artistic talent that stepped in to ink Liefeld’s action-filled pages, including the likes of Neal Adams, Philip Tan, Kevin Eastman, Ed Piskor, Jerry Ordway, and Dan Panosian.  You can look behind the scenes at the process for this pencil-ink partnership in a 48-page tie-in book, Snake Eyes: Deadgames Declassified, also available at comic shops and online here at Amazon.  Diehard comic art fans will have fun identifying the inkers, although Eastman’s inked pages are particularly hard to miss.

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Snake Eyes: G.I. Joe Origins

Review by C.J. Bunce

Both The Man from U.N.C.L.E. and The Mummy were good reboots of franchises, one of a 1960s television series, the other intended to bring forward the Universal Studios Monsters for another generation, but the lack of attention by audiences brought the franchises to a standstill.  Snake Eyes–G.I. Joe Origins, which premiered in theaters in July after a 16 month pandemic delay, is another good re-start of a franchise, and hopefully nothing stands in the way of Hasbro moving ahead with the planned G.I. Joe–Ever Vigilant, originally slated for a 2020 release.

Especially if you’re a fan of the comics and animated series versions of G.I. Joe, you won’t want to miss the home release of Snake Eyes–G.I. Joe OriginsIt’s a solid film, faithfully explaining–as the titles states–the origin of G.I. Joe ace operative Snake Eyes.  If you know the helmeted, silent ninja from the comics or animated show, you also know he is inextricably linked to that COBRA ninja in white garb, Storm Shadow; audiences will get the story of why each of these sworn brothers finds his way to opposing sides in the ongoing battle of good guys vs. bad guys.  You won’t see any “kung fu grip,” although the Japanese martial arts choreographed fight scenes are well done, if toned down from more serious martial arts films.  You also won’t yet learn why Snake Eyes goes silent–much is left for one or more sequels.  But everyone does have “life-like hair.”  And it may just leave you shouting, “Yo, Joe!”  (That’s a good thing). Continue reading

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