Tag Archive: Retro Fix


Last summer we previewed the first phase of a new, retro style line of GI Joe action figures for fans of the 1980s animated GI Joe: A Real American Hero series and the corresponding reboot of GI Joe toys.  The first wave of G.I. Joe ReAction figures–the Kenner-style 3.75-inch figures with less articulation joints than the originals but now with better sculpts–included Snake Eyes, Scarlett, Baroness, Cobra Commander, Destro, Kwinn, G.I. Joe infantry (in three skin colors), and Cobra Troopers (in three skin colors and two costume styles)–for 15 variants in all.  Get ready to add Storm Shadow, Roadblock, Roadblock PSA, Flint, Snake Eyes, Mutt PSA, Duke, Lady Jaye, Bazooka, Major Bludd, Gamemaster, Navy Blue Shirt Sailors, Shocktroopers, and ready-for-battle Cobra Commander, Baroness, and Firefly to your collection, all available for pre-order now at the above links at Entertainment Earth. 

Take a look at our preview of the new line of figures and packaging below.

Continue reading

Review by C.J. Bunce

Thunderball–the word itself conjures James Bond–the meaning of the word as an atomic bomb mushroom cloud has taken a backseat to Ian Fleming’s ninth spy novel from 1961, and the fourth Bond movie that filled theaters for Christmas 1965.  The novel is primarily Fleming’s own detailed, descriptive Bond character study, but with a twist: The story ideas are a combination of scenes created and introduced in screenplay drafts by two other writers.  Thunderball was eyed initially among the first nine novels as the one worthy of becoming the first movie adaptation.  But conflicts among who created what in a writers room before Fleming wrote the novel would be the source of a lawsuit that sidelined the movie and ultimately resulted in five writers (including Richard Maibaum, John Hopkins, Jack Whittingham, and Kevin McClory) named in the movie credits.  It also resulted in the quirky, additional film adaptation, Never Say Never Again, in 1983.  The novel, with its external inputs, is still among Fleming’s best–it’s a combination of all the best elements of Fleming’s adventure and action man writing, a one-stop shop of sorts for anyone looking for a single Bond story that has it all.

Continue reading

Review by C.J. Bunce

First of all, by all accounts McDonald’s has never sold onion rings.

My favorite works by popular creators are the ones that are frequently what the multitudes rarely put on a greatest hits list.  Like Philip K. Dick’s In Milton Lumky Territory or Stephen King’s Joyland.  Now we have Donald E. Westlake′s last novel Call Me a Cab (available now here at Amazon) a heretofore unpublished novel from 1977 (unpublished except in a briefer version in a serialized magazine edition ages ago).  It’s a novel ahead of its time full of 1970s attitude, with realistic, thoughtful characters, without cliché or canned, artificial controversy, and, although it’s from Hard Case Crime, there’s not a single crime in sight for 3,000 miles.  And it’s as riveting as any of his previous brilliant works.

So what about the onion rings?  Back to that in a moment.

Continue reading

Just as MEGO and Super7 begin to re-establish their Star Trek action figure footprints, a nostalgic toy company from the past is going to revisit and expand its own vintage toy line.  The company with the best, broadest, and most fleshed out variety of Star Trek action figures is back, beginning with figures for Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek Discovery, and a movie line beginning with Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan.  With a similar look as its original toys, Playmates Toys isn’t catering to collectors pursuing realistic sculpts, but those who miss the 1990s toys.  Check out images of just the first wave of the coming retro fix below, along with a look back at the first versions.

Continue reading

Review by C.J. Bunce

Not many books give you goosebumps as they take you back to a moment in time.  How do you create not only a new game, but a new industry?  Your next time travel adventure needs to be Arjan Terpstra and Tim Lapetino’s giant look back at not only Pac-Man but the rise of video games.  It’s Pac-Man: Birth of an Icon, simply an incredible, deep dive into the development of the video game and all its incarnations from its beginnings as Puck-Man, almost called Paku-emon (sound familiar?).  From development via pinball, coin-op, and theme park companies Namco, Bally, and Midway (and side-dances with Atari), fans of 1970s and 1980s nostalgia will see how a few key players in Japan created Pac-Man, and even more around the world expanded it into an icon–all out of 111 yellow flashes of light on a computer screen.  The giant book is full of vintage photographs, marketing materials, corporate and engineering design notes, and much more.  Pac-Man: Birth of an Icon might be the best video game history yet, and it’s now available here at Amazon.

Continue reading

Review by C.J. Bunce

The first virtual reality movie?  It’s innovative and brilliant, and showed that Robert Montgomery the actor also had the talent to be a director as much a visionary as Alfred Hitchcock.  The film is his 1946 film noir Lady in the Lake, an experimental movie years ahead of its time, and much more than an adaptation of another Raymond Chandler novel featuring detective Philip Marlowe.   It’s a great story, elevated by unusual direction and a cast of actors tasked with doing something no one had quite done this way before–react and act entirely toward the audience in the place of the protagonist and the film’s point of view.

It’s about murder, and it takes place at Christmas, and the entire film from beginning to end is wrapped up in a bow like your very own Christmas present, available now to stream at Vudu, or here at Amazon on Prime Video or DVD.  If you haven’t seen it, give it a viewing this weekend and you might just see it as the next best Christmas movie of its type since Die Hard, although since it predates Die Hard by four decades you’ll want to flip that thought around.  Along with the requisite noir tropes, Lady in the Lake has visual effects and story surprises at every turn.  It’s pure cinema gold.

Continue reading

Mandalorian phase 2

The Star Wars vintage Kenner action figures changed toys and franchising forever.  Sales of this line were so successful that it’s no surprise the fan nostalgia for these 3.75-inch figures in new packages is still as great as ever, 44 years after their first appearance in a pre-order campaign for Christmas 1977.  Disney knows what its fans want, and so they assembled two takes on a action figures for the Disney+ series The Mandalorian–one with modern molds and articulation in vintage packaging, and the other with retro, classic Kenner style molds and articulation, housed in classic, mock-distressed packaging–plus original-style vinyl capes.  Wave I of this line included IG-11, Moff Gideon, Cara Dune, Greef Karga, Kuiil, “Baby Yoda,” and Din Djarin, the man behind the mask.  That complete set is shipping now at Entertainment Earth and Amazon.  The next wave in the Retro line has just been previewed by Entertainment Earth, who is now accepting pre-orders here.  It’s an equally good line of figures, this time from Season 2, including one of the most collected figures of the original Kenner line, as well as rebooted lines in the 1990s and 2000s: Boba Fett.  It also features Bo-Katan Kryze, Ahsoka Tano, a second season Din aka Mandalorian, The Armorer, and an Imperial Death Trooper.  Check out the new sculpts, accessories, and packaging below.

Continue reading

joe angle banner 2x

Normally this would be the kind of news you’d find at San Diego Comic-Con, which was canceled this year again because of the pandemic.  Hasbro is farming out to action figure and pop culture collectible company Super7 to deliver two new action figure lines, rebooting the classic small-scale action figures based on the 1980s G.I. Joe animated series.  One line will he a step down from the original articulated figures from the 1980s, and the other will be a step up.  The step up is the Ultimates line, articulated 7-inch scale figures with extra arms, heads, and a variety of other accessories.  The step down is the Kenner-style 3.75-inch ReAction line, with less articulation than the original line, but with more series-accurate designs and still more variety–including new figures–to come.

The first wave of G.I. Joe ReAction figures includes Snake Eyes, Scarlett, Baroness, Cobra Commander, Destro, Kwinn, G.I. Joe infantry (in three skin colors), and Cobra Troopers (in three skin colors and two costume styles)–for 15 variants in all.  The first Ultimates wave includes four figures–Duke, Snake Eyes, Cobra Commander, and the Cobra Battle Android Trooper (BAT).  These are in addition to the new -inch and 12-inch figures that are tie-ins to the coming Snake Eyes: G.I. Joes Origins movie (check those out here).

joe 2  joe 1

See detailed views of each figure below.  You can order the Ultimates line now and pre-order all the ReAction figures from the first wave via the above links.

Continue reading

Munsters banner

The Munsters have arrived in collectible toy lines before, but none who could hang out at the Death Star or Mos Eisley cantina and mingle one on one with your other action figures.  So it’s kind of a big deal for the 1964-1966 classic horror comedy series to be getting its Kenner-scale debut this month from toymaker Super7 and its ReAction line.  How would you design a line of figures from this famous monster family?  All black and white?  Grey tone?  The new sculpts and packaging seem to be the best of both worlds, providing a bright yet spooky look, along with some fun, displayable packaging.  We first previewed the prototypes of the new figures (shown below) here at borg in February 2020 before the world ground to a halt.  Note that the packaging art has been updated. 

Check out the final designs below.  You also can order all three figures from the new line via the below links.

Continue reading

Jaxxon fig A  Jaxxon fig B

The Star Wars vintage Kenner action figures changed toys and franchising forever.  Sales of this line were so successful that it’s no surprise the fan nostalgia for these 3.75-inch figures in new packages is still as great as ever, 44 years after their first appearance in a pre-order campaign for Christmas 1977.  Disney’s line of six-inch “Black Series” has quickly caught up to the original line of characters, with new sculpts and more articulation, including even more characters from the Expanded Universe.  At last fans of the original Star Wars comics published by Marvel Comics in the 1970s and 1980s get to see one of the most beloved of all the characters we haven’t yet seen on the big or small screen (but we’re still hoping for that soon): Jaxxon, the six-foot tall Lepi mercenary smuggler from Star Wars Issue #8, Eight for Aduba-3, the Seven Samurai adaptation where we first met the angry talking rabbit and his ship, the Rabbit’s Foot.  

Jaxxon

Jaxxon stayed around for the next three issues and returned for the first appearance of the borg Valance.  Our first real hope of seeing Jaxxon in Star Wars canon was in a variant cover for the rebooted Marvel Comics Star Wars series in 2015, then he re-appeared in the retro Star Wars Issue #108 in 2019, and again for Vader Down.  And this weekend for the first time you can pre-order Jaxxon’s first action figure here from Entertainment Earth.

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: